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On another note I have noticed noone else brought this up; anyone else bothered by folks who put their pets ( dogs and cats , for example), creatures that are basically carnivores by nature and require meat for proper nutrition ( more so than we humans) on vege diets simply because they do not believe in eating meat. I do not think this is cool.

It has been mentioned already.

 

I find it wrong, because some animals simply cannot synthesize some chemicals found in meat/live a healthy life without meat, and thus are obligate carnivores. For example, cats.

 

Edit: Mm, chewy bacon... /drools

Edited by lightbird

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It has been mentioned already.

 

I find it wrong, because some animals simply cannot synthesize some chemicals found in meat/live a healthy life without meat, and thus are obligate carnivores. For example, cats.

 

Edit: Mm, chewy bacon... /drools

OOPPPS, my bad. * Makes note to self- Next time check the whole thread before posting. facepalms self *

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*headtilt* For how long and how good is it?

 

Survey says: How do you like meat cooked: baked, fried (deep fried), shoved in a crock-pot for a day, etc?

Anyway is fine for me. As long as it tastes good.

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I'll agree with CWG on this one - it should be something that you learn at home, not at school. Sorry, but as a teacher we barely have enough hours in the week to teach them what we're supposed to be teaching them and picking up the slack from where their parents aren't teaching them how to be decent human beings already. Why should we waste more time we don't have trying to do even more so that their parents can do even less?

True. There's just a part of me that honestly wants some sort of... I don't even know the name, but a class where you can learn basic household things...? Like how econ classes are necessary (at least in my school, dunno about others) so that kids don't go out and then promptly screw themselves over.

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True. There's just a part of me that honestly wants some sort of... I don't even know the name, but a class where you can learn basic household things...? Like how econ classes are necessary (at least in my school, dunno about others) so that kids don't go out and then promptly screw themselves over.

???Home Ec???

 

 

At my first high school there was a cooking class but it wasn't mandatory it was an elective course.

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I'm practically a carnivore xd.png I don't personally think that its bad to eat it...but I know that some of the animals are raised in really bad conditions. Maybe people should go for free range meat and stuff?

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I've mentioned this in this thread before, but free range doesn't necessarily mean they had a good life.

Take chickens (my previous example as well).

Chickens that are 'free range' are in a 9"x9" cage. 'Caged' chickens are in a 7"x7" cage. Cageless chickens are the ones not in a cage. Do research on what the different things mean, advertising is deceptive.

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???Home Ec???

 

 

At my first high school there was a cooking class but it wasn't mandatory it was an elective course.

In our final of compulsary technology we did do a term on cooking. But seriously, by 14yrs you should be able to at least make a basic spagbol.

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In our final of compulsary technology we did do a term on cooking. But seriously, by 14yrs you should be able to at least make a basic spagbol.

Given the amount of thirty+ year olds that can't...HA.

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Home ec, yeah.

 

Has there been any tracking of the number of food-poisoning incidents or whatnot in regards to what seems to be observed by all of us (that nobody knows how to handle food properly)?

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*nods* Home economics. It used to be rather widely taught, but was declining even while I was at school. mI'm not sure if the kids just now hitting secondary school are learning it at all.

 

Although I *do* remember my mum having a rather interesting bit of annoyance when we were making leeks in white sauce. She patiently taught me the proper way to make a roux at home (to get some practise in) and was pretty put out to discover they taught us a 'cheats' method in class.

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Given the amount of thirty+ year olds that can't...HA.

Seriously, it's not that hard.

 

Boil the mince til it's brown all through. Boil your veg. Throw them in a pan with some tomato passata with herbs, or a jar of spagbol sauce. Boil your spaghetti til soft and can stick to a wall when tossed lightly at it. Spag on plate, bol on top. Job jobbed.

 

How can they not do that?

Edited by Kestra15

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Seriously, it's not that hard.

 

Boil the mince til it's brown all through. Boil your veg. Throw them in a pan with some tomato passata with herbs, or a jar of spagbol sauce. Boil your spaghetti til soft and can stick to a wall when tossed lightly at it. Spag on plate, bol on top. Job jobbed.

 

How can they not do that?

I know middle-aged people who literally can't make TEA. Don't ask me, I was cooking at an early age, but...

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I know middle-aged people who literally can't make TEA. Don't ask me, I was cooking at an early age, but...

...?

 

But, it's just boiling water and dunking the bag in (simplest way). How is it that they don't know how...

 

@_@

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My grandpa can't cook. He tries, but it turns out ewww.

I have been cooking since I could stand basically. I remember standing on a stool in order to cook stuff.

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*nods* Home economics. It used to be rather widely taught, but was declining even while I was at school. mI'm not sure if the kids just now hitting secondary school are learning it at all.

It was an elective when I was in middle school, but we didn't learn anything useful. (Middle school being 6-8th grades, ages approx 11-14)

 

Kestra: What is this spagbol of which you speak? (And for that matter, what is mincemeat?)

 

...?

 

But, it's just boiling water and dunking the bag in (simplest way). How is it that they don't know how...

 

@_@

 

I can see someone putting the bad in before boiling the water then walking away expecting a magical transformation into tea.

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Kestra: What is this spagbol of which you speak? (And for that matter, what is mincemeat?)

Spagbol = Spaghetti Bolognese.

 

Mincemeat = ground meat/minced meat.

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I had no idea on spices but I learned how to cook steak from eating out. I saw what it was supposed to look like and made sure mine did. Overcooked past medium-rare but heck dunked in some BBQ sauce and it wasn't bad for my first try. Pork and chicken you just make sure it isn't bloody. It isn't that hard. The only thing that my dad taught me was to make sure my hands were washed before and after you cooked and the place you are cooking is cleaned before and after you are done. That and check the middle when cooking meat because it cooks from the outside in. My point is cooking isn't all that hard. Especially meat which can be easily done by example. When handling you need clean hands before and after handling. Area where handling must be clean before and after handling. Raw meat should be frozen until ready to use in which case I was told it is best to thaw in fridge. All leftovers should be refrigerated. Leftovers should be eaten within a week or two. Two might be pushing it. Any mistakes or missing info?

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All leftovers should be refrigerated. Leftovers should be eaten within a week or two. Two might be pushing it. Any mistakes or missing info?

Depends on the leftovers, how it is stored, etc.

 

For example, we have frozen stew and bolognese that we keep for months, then defrost and eat all in one go. Yet rice has to be instantly cooled before refrigeration otherwise it goes manky quickly.

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Frozen leftovers last a lot longer than refrigerated ones though. My grandparents freeze everything and its good for months.

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Depends on the leftovers, how it is stored, etc.

 

For example, we have frozen stew and bolognese that we keep for months, then defrost and eat all in one go. Yet rice has to be instantly cooled before refrigeration otherwise it goes manky quickly.

Ah frozen leftovers. Derp. Yeah my stepdad always cooks way more beef stroganoff then needed so it gets frozen until the next time we want beef stroganoff.

 

 

EDIT:Thank you kestra for correction of spelling

Edited by crazywargod

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Ah frozen leftovers. Derp. Yeah my stepdad always cooks way more beef stroganoph (spell fail) then needed so it gets frozen until the next time we want beef stroganoph (spell fail).

Stroganoff.

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Yumm beef stroganoff. That's one of my favorite foods, I wonder if I can convince grandma to make it again.

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I made chicken noodle soup for dinner. =3 Basil, cumin, parsley, pepper, and garlic salt make for excellent broth.

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