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I'm Australian, though my accent isn't quiet the typical Aussie accent that is depicted in television. I've been told I have a Northern Queensland accent, despite the fact that I've only lived in South Queensland and only happened to for a couple of years. For most of my life, I've lived in New South Wales, but apparently I pick it up from my mother. My accent, though being Australian, leans more to Irish-Australian. I shorten my words and run them together (example; try saying 'calm bear clater' in a faster than normal speed running the words together. That's how I would say 'come back later'). Words/sentences such as 'Mate', 'Love', 'She'll be right', 'No worries', 'Nahyeah/Yeahnah' are frequent in my vocabulary. It's something I don't really notice, and neither do others unless they haven't been in Australia long.

Some Australians also tend to be accent sympathetic. In other words, when we spend a lot of time around a particular person with a strong accent, we'll adopt their accent while talking to them unknowingly. I work with a large variety of accents, so I often catch myself talking with a slight Vietnamese or Indonesian accent at work.

Once I'm out of work, though, I'm straight back to the bogan accent xd.png

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I love accents! The European countries have the best ones. also, has anyone noticed how hard it is to get out of an accent once you start speaking in it?

 

I'm a New Zealander and personally I think our accents aren't that great. A lot of our diction is not very precise (but I love the slang, like "mate," "yeah, nah.. maybe" etc.). I'm curious - how do the rest of you out there see New Zealand accents?

 

P.S. if you can't tell NZ from our friends,Australian accents, SHAME ON YOU smile.gif

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Who does not love accents?

 

I play PS3 and I love hearing the British accents, the German accents, even a few Australian ones.

 

I have a patron who comes into my library who has a Scottish accent. She has fantastic stories and I could listen to her talk all day.

 

I of course, being from Connecticut, have no accent. (HA!)

 

For those who want to hear me... *Pokes her Dragcave Video link in siggy*

Edited by Kanaye

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I'm a New Zealander. I think it's pretty much impossible to comment on one's own accent. xd.png

I like a variety of British accents (usually the less "heavy" ones, although Scottish in general is awesome xd.png). I also like Spanish accents.

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I play PS3 and I love hearing the British accents, the German accents, even a few Australian ones.

 

I have a patron who comes into my library who has a Scottish accent. She has fantastic stories and I could listen to her talk all day.

*thwaps*

 

Using the term 'British' accents is fine - as long as you are using it to refer to accents from all of the British Isles. Using 'British' and then 'Scottish' seperately doesn't work. British =/= English.

 

[/pet peeve]

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I honestly have no idea what my accent sounds like. I'm from the Alabama Gulf Coast and haven't really had a chance for people to tell me about my accent. Although, there was this one lady when I was a kid who said that I didn't have a typical southern accent. I know that I do have the southern drawl at times but it's not always present.

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I live on the East Coast of USA (New Jersey/Pennsylvania area) and I have a Newscaster English or General American accent. I'm fairly neutral when it comes to my accent and I don't like or dislike it, although apparently I pronounce several words in a stereotypical English accent (Such as garage, water and door). I'm also notorious for pronouncing the 'h' in 'herb' and other letters that tend to be silent.

 

But I have a thing for Swedish accents. I love Swedish accents.

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I of course, being from Connecticut, have no accent. (HA!)

 

For those who want to hear me... *Pokes her Dragcave Video link in siggy*

 

I live in Connecticut. I have been here since 1979, but I have luckily managed to keep my New York accent.

 

And, today, I learned how to properly pronounce "Kanaye".

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Whelp, I live in Wisconsin, and a girl from California moved to my city, and she's in my Algebra class. She noted my accent, but I couldn't tell any difference in her voice. Weird, huh?

 

I want to live in England for awhile, then come back to the U.S. and see if I adopted the English accent at all xd.png

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Florida is a hodgepodge of Northerners, Southerners, and Hispanics of all kinds (but mostly islanders like Puerto Rico and Cuba). That being said, my accent is closest to midwestern (or "TV accent" as I've heard it referred to as before) with some southern influence — yes, I do use the word "y'all." Frequently. I also occasionally adopt a faint Mexican accent if I've spent a lot of time watching Spanish media, but it goes away as soon as someone mentions it.

 

I'm awful at imitating, or so my parents say. My cousin seems to think I have the British accent (not sure which one lol) down pat, but she's from New Jersey and not England, so what does she know. I didn't notice any difference in her accent from mine besides the lack of the usage of the word "y'all", but I did notice in her sister's, omg.

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Yes, I am British, though some people think I'm lying. dry.gif

EDIT: Because of rude people.

Edited by Moka_Akashiya

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*thwaps*

 

Using the term 'British' accents is fine - as long as you are using it to refer to accents from all of the British Isles. Using 'British' and then 'Scottish' seperately doesn't work. British =/= English.

 

[/pet peeve]

Two separate people.

 

One said he himself had a British accent and the other said she herself had a Scottish accent.

 

I am only using the terms they themselves used.

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I have a northern New York Accent...... Or so I have been told. From what I understand about it is that when we talk we skip some letters. Like with any words ending with T's, D's, K's and such instead of actually saying it was insinuate that we say it without actually doing so. I wish I could describe it to everyone.

 

Oh came up with something with the word ABOUT most people make the TI sound at the end by putting your tounge at the roof of your mouth. With me I don't do that I just say the word without doing that tounge thing, so it seems like I am saying it without doing so.

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I have a medium British accent, as I was born in London. Yes, I sound like the Doctor if you've ever seen Doctor Who. I use bloody a lot, along with flats instead of houses. I hate tea though.

Nice try wink.gif

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I should have a German accent when I talk English but my brother-in-law once told me I speak with a strong Oxford accent. He is from York, England, and since I spent all my holidays with him and my sister, who had already adopted his accent, I now sound a bit Yorkish, too.

 

My German accent is from North Germany. We speak mostly High German which means: pure German with no accent. But I'm using some Low German words because many of the elders around here only speak Low German and even though I can't speak Low German properly I at least understand what they say.

Low German is a language of it's own and not an accent of German. It is a spoken language only, just recently linguists are trying to convert it into a written form. So books in Low German vary a lot concerning spelling. Some words have more in common with English than with German. For example "ole clock" means old clock which is very different to the German version "alte Uhr". But it's spoken a bit differently than the English words. More German. wink.gif Which as far as I know means more rough or harsh.

Well, that's what we Northern Germans are: harsh but hearty. laugh.gif

 

Some words of solace for persons who learnt German and went to Germany and still didn't understand a word: There are areas in Germany where people have an accent so strong even we Germans don't understand what our fellow German is saying.

Edited by Lilithiana

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To someone out of the region, or from another country, then, yes, I would have an accent. Don't really notice it myself, unless somebody mentions it. Saying that, though, I'm from the county of Gloucestershire, in the south-west of England, and, depending on which part of the county people are from, accents do tend to vary a little bit.

 

If I were to describe my accent...eh, I'm not entirely sure. According to my grandma, I have a slight Gloucestershire accent, but as I said above, there are variations, so that's not very helpful in describing exactly what I sound like.

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I'm Mexican, but speak English like a native from the nothwestern USA. biggrin.gif

I looooove Romanian accents though, especially on guys...they drive me crazy.

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I don't speak with much of an accent, but sometimes I'll say something in a 'country' way, like not using a word correctly, or saying it with a southern accent.

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I have a southern accent but I repressed it at a young age by copying news anchors on tv. I can still do it on command but there are a few times it comes out. When I am home and talk to my sister or mom, when I'm drunk I usually get stuck on it or if I talk to a friend of mine, She loves it when I talk that way wink.gif

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In Greece we have many different accents, even thought we are a small country.

1)Epirus accent: cutting vowels, because of the cold and many Slavic words, because it's near to borders.

2)Macedonian accent: thick l (like double ll), change of the prepositions μου (mu) to με (me) and σου to (se). Even thought it's an area close to borders it has the accent of Greeks who lived at Instubul and Minor Asia and came there after th Lozani's term

3)Thessalian accent: speaking with much opening the mouth and changing vowels e (ε) to i (η) o to a (α) and to u (ου)

4)Peloponnisos' accent: wherever there is the phrase li they accent it lii and ni to nii

5) Ionian islands' accent: it's quick and it looks like a song. They have also have many Italian words because of the Venetocrasy they had.

6)Crete's accent: they say k as ch and they also speak quick and like singing

7)Pontium accent: This isn't at a specific place of Greece, but you can hear it all over the Greece after the emigrants who came after the slaughter a Pontus. They speak more like ancient Greek, because they hadn't many connections with the rest Greece for years

8)Cyprus' accent: This isn't also a place of Greece, but we share the same language, they put a "n" at the end of every word and they speak quick and it's like singing

Off course there are much more accents, but I don't know them all. Also there are many local words for every place. My accent, even thought I'm from Peloponnisos, it's like Makedonian because of my mother. I love Spain's accent.

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Speaking English, Im more of a formal American. If I slip in my Dutch accent though, it's difficult to get out of it.

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I have a fairly standard American accent, just because where I live in Florida, though it may be in the south, not many of us have heavy southern accents except those who move here from Georgia, the Carolinas, etc. So mostly everyone around here has a 'basic' American accent. But often I will slip into a southern accent because my family on my mother's side is heavily southern. My mother is from South Carolina so she speaks with a bit of a drawl, and her parents have thick southern accents - simply because I'm around them so much, I tend to say certain things in a southern accent. It's especially noticeable when I'm talking to other people with that accent.

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I live in like Southern USA and I have a very very slight southern accent. I hear it more when I'm in California or up north. It is very very slight.

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