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Well, I'm from the Ruhr area in Germany... our accent is considered to be very "working class" (coal mines and heavy industry spring to mind), rather coarse and blunt. But fun.

 

e.g.

 

Hör mal, das kannst du so nicht sagen.
(meaning roughly: Listen, you can't say it like that.)

would become

Hömma, dat kannse so nich sachen.

 

 

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Can't say I've noticed any particular accent, asides from regional (but that only springs up when I go home)

 

My husband is from the US, I'm Canadian. He says he is disappointed by my complete lack of a stereotypical Canadian accent ( xd.png ), and always points out the differences in the way I speak when we go to visit my parents. I dunno what it is, but the regional accent just goes away whenever I leave the area.

Edited by Khymarea

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Can't say I've noticed any particular accent, asides from regional (but that only springs up when I go home)

 

My husband is from the US, I'm Canadian. He says he is disappointed by my complete lack of a stereotypical Canadian accent ( xd.png ), and always points out the differences in the way I speak when we go to visit my parents. I dunno what it is, but the regional accent just goes away whenever I leave the area.

That happens to a lot of us when we no longer live surrounded by 'our' accent. The North is only slightly audible in mine most of the time, unless I'm spending time with other northerners down here when it comes back full force. Likewise my Grandma; she has now been living in the States for so many years that she sounds almost native, yet after a week back here she's sounding more English (not totally English, but much *more* English).

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I live near Philadelphia, so I sort of have a Philly accent. Not as much as people who actually live in the city, though. People there pronounce "water" as "wooder". I do not do that. It annoys me xd.png

Haha. I pronounce water the same way.

Though I tend to pronounce mountain as as moounen. With a long ou sound and a short en leaving out the t almost completely.

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I've never noticed that I have any sort of accent, but my mom complains that I have a Kansas accent when I was born in California. My little brother happens to have a British accent, but refuses to admit it. That's what he gets for watching BBC shows, I guess...

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I didn't think North Eastern folks in the US (Michigan, Ohio, etc.) had audible accents, but upon rooming with someone from PA last year at school and having her point it out, I guess we pronounce some things funny.

 

Pronouncing "milk" as "melk" for one thing, I guess. And apparently we say the 'a' in "pajamas" really screechy lol.

 

Then when I was down in Florida once, some guy found the way I say "escalator" very amusing. I never found out why though...

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I guess you could say I have a "Texan" accent. I don't sound as bad off as other people do, but people in a state like Washington can tell I'm from there. However my dialect is a bit thrown off because my mom's from South Dakota and I say different words for some down here.

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I live in Germany, in Cologne and there is a funny accent. It calls: Kölsch. Pronounced: [kœɫːʃ]. ^^ In Cologne, we are also famous for our beer that is called "Kölsch" too.

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If I have a southern accent, I can't tell and I've never asked anyone not from Texas. The most I know is that I've got an American accent.

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I live in Brooklyn, NY, but my family is originally from Trinidad, so we have a Trinidadian accent and 'Brooklyn' accent that varies all over brooklyn. It naturally comes and goes depending on who I speak to, but I use either one if I want to.

 

I also pick up accents fairly quickly. I went to England as a child for only about a week and a half and already had the accent. After my 2nd days in Vermont, I picked up that accent from a friend, and while in Vermont I met someone who had a Brazilian accent and I somehow picked it up after a few hours of speaking with him. I also visited Trinidad in 2011 and after a week of being there, I lost my Brooklyn accent laugh.gif.

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I live in Boise, Idaho. We had an equine vet move up here from Texas, and he had the real southern drawl; when he talked it was so slow I almost wanted to tell him to hurry up and just say it already!.When I would talk he would tell me to slow down, and that if i ever went down south people would be asking me to reduce the speed limit on my speech.

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I have a strong Scottish accent...it's primarily a mixture of Caithness and Shetland but there's some English influences like how I say 'For' and 'From' instead of the stereotypical 'Fae'

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I am from the area around Boston, MA. Far famed for the dropping of the 'r' however, this accent only comes out when someone is talking really fast or has lived in the city itself for most of their lives.

 

Or if someone just gets lazy, then I have the accent.

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I'm from Wisconsin, famous for over-pronunciation our vowels xd.png

...buuut because I have my own individual accent that really doesn't conform to WI i cant really think of any examples >_>; Personally, I say 'Head' when I'm trying to says 'Had,' but that could just be me xd.png

 

EDIT: Oh! an example could just be Wisconsin xd.png people from out of state tend to not say it the same. We say Wis CON sin. With the O clearly heard. I've heard a lot of out of state people simply jumble it all together.

(not to mention it's absolutely halarious to listen to people try to say our city names wink.gifhttp://youtu.be/zGcQCtFlENA)

Edited by Wandering4Ever

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I have a hint of a southern accent. I can make myself do an Australian accent though, and sing in an Australian Accent! lol

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I have a Hampshire (in England, in case there's a Hampshire in America/Australia etc) accent, since that was where I was born; it's pretty similar to most south eastern English accents. Generally, I miss out a lot of sounds, especially 't' and 'h' - although we do say 'grass' and 'bath properly ( as in, using the 'ar' sound instead of the 'ah' sound for the letter a.) unlike the people in Cornwall where I live now! My mum says I speak with more of a 'public school' accent now since I go to a public school, which is worrying as I really don't consider myself posh!

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I've been born and raised in Northern California. The only thing I know thats unique to our accent is that we say 'hella'. Other than that I don't think we have a strongly recognizable accent.

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I was born, raised, and live in Texas... So, howdy y'all.

 

JK. I actually don't have much of an accent. I really hate country accents so I try to avoid dropping into one. But I do sometimes... Notably, when I'm trying to mimic other countries' accents. I can't do it, they all come out as Texan. tongue.gif

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I moved to Texas from Northern Virginia, and from Texas to the Midwest. Since moving from VA, people generally say I have a noticeable accent, my voice is considerably softer, my vowel sounds aren't as harsh as the locals. i can pick up dialects pretty easily, but I have to make a conscious effort to replicate the speech patterns here. But then again, you run into so many dialects anywhere in the USA, that pretty much everyone has different undertones in there voices. One Kentuckian can sound noticeably different than another. I guess accents are easier to name in places like the United kingdom.

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Freaking love accents. tongue.gif Other than sounding pretty cool, they're such an interesting thing. I've got a friend who is really into language and diction and stuff and he's got some really interesting things to say about accents and the like. happy.gif

 

The only accent that I really can't stand is transatlantic. If you don't know what that sounds like, think of old movies where they kind of try to achieve a "general" or "universal" accent. It's the most annoying thing to listen to, I swear. rolleyes.gif

 

Sorry if anyone here has moved around a lot and genuinely has an accent like that. I'm sure yours sounds heaps better! tongue.gif

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I moved to Texas from Northern Virginia, and from Texas to the Midwest. Since moving from VA, people generally say I have a noticeable accent, my voice is considerably softer, my vowel sounds aren't as harsh as the locals. i can pick up dialects pretty easily, but I have to make a conscious effort to replicate the speech patterns here. But then again, you run into so many dialects anywhere in the USA, that pretty much everyone has different undertones in there voices. One Kentuckian can sound noticeably different than another. I guess accents are easier to name in places like the United kingdom.

You say that, but I knew someone who could tell where you had been born in Newcastle by your accent. He said it differed north or south of the Tyne.

 

And, yeah, we just name accents by regions. It's not all that complicated.

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I Have A Mostly Irish Accent But I Live In New Zealand So A Few Words I Say Sound Like A Kiwi And Not Like An Irish Accent.

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My girlfriend says just have a European accent in English, which is pretty vague (but she loves it).

 

Here in my country, I have a West-Flemish accent. We often use "è" and "oa" instead of a normal "e" and "aa".

 

I don't know how it goes in English, but in Dutch, there's also lots of words that are specific to a certain province, region, city or even town. We just use entirely different words for some things that people from two cities away won't recognize as existing words. For an instance, we use the verb "paluffen" for petting (like if you pet your cat or dog), a word they never heard of one city away.

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since I'm australian, my accent sounds really different to foreigners but to be quite honest, aussies don't really have different accents no matter what state they're from

 

unless you're from queensland, then you're a real bogan

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