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RheaZen

Grammar, Spelling, and Fonts

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For fonts, I usually like to open up introduction posts with Vivaldi when RP'ing, but Times New Roman is a classic. Unfortunately, they are fairly small, so I usually have to change the size a bit.

Edited by satyr76

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I'm the only person on my facebook, MSN, etc to use proper grammar. (although not tonight... it's late and I'm uber tired so plz no going "ohemgeeurgrammardied!!")

 

It's pretty annoying, actually. >.< So many times I have to use the urban dictionary for stuff, which is impossible when evritin iss splted ronly anewai.

So many times I've looked up what it meant and found it means something that, to put it blunty, it is definitely not. So I ask them what it is, they spell it completely differently, and say they don't know anyways. dry.gif

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I'm a grammar Nazi and have been one since I turned 11. I absolutely cannot stand spelling and grammar mistakes! I am very picky when it comes to things such as commas, parentheses (the punctuation goes AFTER the closing mark, and it applies to whatever you wrote before you started the parentheses), and quotation marks. My biggest pet peeve is misuse of your/you're and there/their/they're. My grade school taught this in first grade, and my friends don't even manage to use them properly, let alone people older than myself.

 

The only thing that I'm unsure with entirely is quotation marks. I was always taught that the punctuation goes outside of the quote. Does this apply to quoting a song name, book title, etc. as well?

 

Ex. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe." vs. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe".

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The only thing that I'm unsure with entirely is quotation marks. I was always taught that the punctuation goes outside of the quote. Does this apply to quoting a song name, book title, etc. as well?

 

Ex. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe." vs. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe".

That might be because the grammaticaly correct useage of quotation marks depends on which English speaking country you are in. As far as I'm aware it differs between the UK and US, and I'm not sure which of the two models places like Canada and Australia use.

 

In the UK the punctuation should be inside the quotation marks if it forms a complete sentance (eg. "I'm here!" she said.), and there should also be punctuation outside of them if the quoted words end a sentance (eg. She said "I'm here.".). As a general rule quotation marks around book and/or movie titles would not require punctuation marks, unless such marks form part of the actual title.

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I'm a grammar Nazi and have been one since I turned 11. I absolutely cannot stand spelling and grammar mistakes! I am very picky when it comes to things such as commas, parentheses (the punctuation goes AFTER the closing mark, and it applies to whatever you wrote before you started the parentheses), and quotation marks. My biggest pet peeve is misuse of your/you're and there/their/they're. My grade school taught this in first grade, and my friends don't even manage to use them properly, let alone people older than myself.

 

The only thing that I'm unsure with entirely is quotation marks. I was always taught that the punctuation goes outside of the quote. Does this apply to quoting a song name, book title, etc. as well?

 

Ex. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe." vs. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe".

I was always taught that punctuation went inside of the quote. o.o

For example:

 

He stood, saying, "You certainly shall not."

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I'm a grammar Nazi and have been one since I turned 11. I absolutely cannot stand spelling and grammar mistakes! I am very picky when it comes to things such as commas, parentheses (the punctuation goes AFTER the closing mark, and it applies to whatever you wrote before you started the parentheses), and quotation marks. My biggest pet peeve is misuse of your/you're and there/their/they're. My grade school taught this in first grade, and my friends don't even manage to use them properly, let alone people older than myself.

 

The only thing that I'm unsure with entirely is quotation marks. I was always taught that the punctuation goes outside of the quote. Does this apply to quoting a song name, book title, etc. as well?

 

Ex. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe." vs. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe".

Technically, you should have the punctuation inside of quotation marks, but in some cases it doesn't make sense; for example, it's grammatically correct to quote you like this: you said "I am very picky when it comes to things such as commas!" even though that exclamation point wasn't actually something you said, but something I'm using for emphasis. Personally, I would rather have it be like this: you said "I am very picky when it comes to things such as commas"!

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That might be because the grammaticaly correct useage of quotation marks depends on which English speaking country you are in. As far as I'm aware it differs between the UK and US, and I'm not sure which of the two models places like Canada and Australia use.

 

In the UK the punctuation should be inside the quotation marks if it forms a complete sentance (eg. "I'm here!" she said.), and there should also be punctuation outside of them if the quoted words end a sentance (eg. She said "I'm here.".). As a general rule quotation marks around book and/or movie titles would not require punctuation marks, unless such marks form part of the actual title.

I'm American, but I usually use the UK rules (unless it's for an assignment or something) because I think they make more sense. wink.gif

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Ex. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe." vs. My favourite song is "Love Like Woe".

Outside the quotes there because the period isn't part of the song title.

 

I was always taught that punctuation went inside of the quote. o.o

For example:

 

He stood, saying, "You certainly shall not."

 

In that case, it's dialogue, so inside punctuation is right as far as I know. But for titles, punctuation goes outside.

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In that case, it's dialogue, so inside punctuation is right as far as I know. But for titles, punctuation goes outside.

That's basically my rule for quotation/punctuation things, but I still get confused. Like when pointing out errors in a RP, it should be something like this:

Instead of "he said" it should be "He said".

 

Right? With the period outside the quotation marks?

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That's basically my rule for quotation/punctuation things, but I still get confused. Like when pointing out errors in a RP, it should be something like this:

Instead of "he said" it should be "He said".

 

Right? With the period outside the quotation marks?

...nooo, what you quoted just said that for dialogue the punctuation goes inside. o-0 For titles or quotes it goes inside.

 

The difference between quotes and dialogue would be something like:

 

Person A said "Person B is so stupid, they said that 'the moon is made of cheese!' in class today."

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No, I was quoting the person. x3 That was a bad example, here's a better one:

 

Instead of "walking to The School" it should be "walking to the school".

 

But didn't you say for titles and quotes it goes outside?

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No, I was quoting the person. x3 That was a bad example, here's a better one:

 

Instead of "walking to The School" it should be "walking to the school".

 

But didn't you say for titles and quotes it goes outside?

Yes, unless The School is some name that is a proper noun and needs the capitalizing.

 

And I don't understand the last question? I wasn't using quotes to mean dialogue or speaking, I meant literal quotes, as in the Person A/Person B example.

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It's not actualy all that hard. Really it isn't. You just have to think of what it would look like *without* the quotation marks. If it's a full sentance that you would normally end with punctuation then the punctuation goes inside the quotation marks. If it isn't, then you don't put punctuation there.

 

If, when you close the quotation, you've also finished that sentance then you put another bit of punctuation outside of them.

 

Examples.

 

"But I did catch the train home." she said. <- Notice punctuation inside the quotation, but not outside it.

 

"But" she said "I did catch the train home.". <- Notice the split quotation, no punctuation inside or outside the first bit, and both inside and outside on the last bit.

 

She said "But I did catch the train home.". <- Notice punctuation both outside and inside the quotation marks.

 

Edit: typos

Edited by TikindiDragon

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That's...different. o-0

 

The way I know it would be

 

"But I did catch the train home," she said. (Because 'she said' isn't a stand alone sentence.)

 

"But," she said, "I did catch the train home." (No second period and commas in split dialogue.)

 

She said "But I did catch the train home." (No second period.)

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Well, I don't know if it's correct or not, but I typically keep punctuation out of my quotes when critiquing a roleplay. For example:

 

Wow, this is quite a sentence with no break! Try adding a comma after "war".

 

I believe that that period should be inside the quotation marks, but I don't do it because I don't want to cause confusion and, like I said before, I do not like that rule.

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That's...different. o-0

 

The way I know it would be

 

"But I did catch the train home," she said. (Because 'she said' isn't a stand alone sentence.)

 

"But," she said, "I did catch the train home." (No second period and commas in split dialogue.)

 

She said "But I did catch the train home." (No second period.)

See that would be the difference between English and American useage, which I believed I mentioned above. My post is grammaticaly correct in English.

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Well, I don't know if it's correct or not, but I typically keep punctuation out of my quotes when critiquing a roleplay. For example:

 

Wow, this is quite a sentence with no break! Try adding a comma after "war".

That's what I do/I meant x3

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What.

 

WHAT.

 

How could they? Why-? But...

 

It was coming, I guess. C'mon, they added "gurl" to the dictionary...

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It was coming, I guess. C'mon, they added "gurl" to the dictionary...

Wait what.

 

I could maybe understand adding 'lol' and 'omg', but 'gurl'? That's retarded.

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See that would be the difference between English and American useage, which I believed I mentioned above. My post is grammaticaly correct in English.

Is it? I've only learned the "British" English, though I've now inevitably taken in some US English influences, and I was taught the way NixAyum put it. (And I've honestly never seen your version, be it in books or otherwise.)

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Tolkien wrote in British English and didn't double punctuation that way. Rather, quotes were 'single' for quotations and "double" for emphasizing a word, which is the opposite of American English. Tolkien didn't write so long ago that British English punctuation would have changed so drastically that more full stops than absolutely required would be added to a sentence. At least, I wouldn't think so.

 

Also, boooo on style guides dismissing the Oxford comma. I will use it 'til the end! Language is a living thing: It just means the Oxford comma is going out of style. My sentences therefore shall be old-fashioned.

 

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*Shrugs* That's just how I was taught to use punctuation when I was in school.

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