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Here's another accent quiz. It has a few different questions than the other, plus it takes into account age and gender I think. I think it's more accurate and you can see your other linguistic influences.

 

http://www.gotoquiz.com/what_american_accent_do_you_have

Heh, I got the same. I guess I really do have a "Philly Accent".

 

But I'd say it's more South Jersey than Philly, they are slightly different... To me anyway.

 

 

"Your Result: Philadelphia

 

Your accent is as Philadelphian as a cheesesteak! If you're not from Philadelphia, then you're from someplace near there like south Jersey, Baltimore, or Wilmington. if you've ever journeyed to some far off place where people don't know that Philly has an accent, someone may have thought you talked a little weird even though they didn't have a clue what accent it was they heard."

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Wikipedia, I just found out, has a nice list of english speaking accents (dialects). It even lists subtypes, narrowing down the regions even more.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_dialects

 

^And yeah, Zovesta's right. You might not realize it, but there are usually subtle (though sometimes obvious) differences between accents. The way you say cot vs. caught; stalk vs. stock; Merry vs. Mary vs. marry. Similar words that are pronounced either the same or differently depending on which area you picked up your linguistic nature from.

Edited by Daydreamer09

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My Results:

 

user posted image

Northern

 

You have a Northern accent. That could either be the Chicago/Detroit/Cleveland/Buffalo accent (easily recognizable) or the Western New England accent that news networks go for.

 

 

 

I'm from southern Missouri though xd.png

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Apparently, I was brought up to use the 'queen's' English when I was little, in England. Now, I've moved to SA. Apparently, I don't really have much of an accent... But, I do sound American sometimes - which may be the effect of TV.

 

I want my British accent back. Nao.

 

I, personally, hate the Afrikaans accent - no offenceto anyone who is Afrikaans. Though, oddly enough, my Afrikaans side of the family doesn't really have that accent? (I don't have an Afrikaans accent, btw. I speak the language about once a week, perhaps one or two words..)

Edited by Chicogal

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Says I have a Southern Accent...

 

user posted image

Don't even live in the USA. xd.png

Edited by Ælex

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I have a *drummroll* CANADIAN accent. As a girl in my class said, "You speak a mix of American and British!" I just stared at her. (We're in Norway BTW)

 

I might acctually have a trace of a Norwegian accent as well, though not clear enough to really be noticed.

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I don't have an accent (well, I'm American, anyway.) I'm a dull individual. :|

I do have a slight thing with my A's, where I kind of accent them, but I don't think that qualifies much. "Have" is pronounced "Hay-ev", for example.

If you were in my part of the world you'd be considered heavily accented wink.gif

 

Edited to add: Been reading through a few of the details on those wiki links to english dialects - interesting to know that the use of thee, thou, thine (which is pretty common in my family) is pretty much a Lancashire thing. Seems there more Lank in my accent than I realise. Although it does explain why I used to get the odd funny look from peopel down here when I've said thing like "Twixt me 'n thee..."

Edited by TikindiDragon

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My southern accent isn't very noticeable among my southern peers wink.gif can't get much more south in the US than florida, now can we? but to me i have a 'regular" accent because everyone i know talks like me, more or less. if i were to travel out of state or out of country, i'd probably recognize my accent more. it seems, though, that sometimes the 'southernness' of my accent stands out more than others. like today, for example, i could really tell i was speaking all southern-y. :B

Edited by glamoursea2

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I have a New Yorker/Spanish/British accent. >_>;

ohmy.gif quite a combination there. that is an accent i'd love to hear cool.gif

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Wikipedia, I just found out, has a nice list of english speaking accents (dialects). It even lists subtypes, narrowing down the regions even more.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_dialects

I actually had quite a laugh reading some of the stuff on Philly accents there.

 

I have heard people that talk like that but not everyone does. And I wouldn't say I really have a Philly accent. Some of the stuff on there I've never heard anyone say. So it's not entirely accurate.

 

 

I really laughed at the 'hoagie' vs. 'grinder' thing. I'm from South Jersey and just move to PA not too long ago and never heard of the word grinder before, but apparently it means 'sub' or 'hoagie'. I've had many an argument about that with people. xd.png

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I say, would you like a cup of tea?

 

guess where im from/

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What? When people say stalk and stock it's supposed to sound the same?

I say them the same. I've lived in NYC, Maryland, and Pittsburgh and I've noticed friends I have in Pittsburgh and Maryland say the words the same (with an 'awwww' sound for the vowels) New York...well, that's more of an 'or' sound for stalk and an 'ah' sound for stock tongue.gif

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I have a New Yorker/Spanish/British accent. >_>;

Which part of the British Isles?

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I want an accent! I love hearing all of the different accents and dialects that people have.

 

I guess I have your average nasally american accent thing going on o__o can't be all that pleasant to listen to but you can usually understand what I'm saying.

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Been reading through a few of the details on those wiki links to english dialects - interesting to know that the use of thee, thou, thine (which is pretty common in my family) is pretty much a Lancashire thing. Seems there more Lank in my accent than I realise. Although it does explain why I used to get the odd funny look from peopel down here when I've said thing like "Twixt me 'n thee..."

"Twixt me 'n thee..." blink.gif And Thee, thou, thine? hat happened to the good old you?

 

What? When people say stalk and stock it's supposed to sound the same?
I pronounce them differently. When I say stock, my voice is lower than when I say stalk. I also think there's something with the vowel that I can't quite pinpoint. Other than that, they're fairly similair.

 

Does anyone else pronounce Katy and Katie differently?

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With stalk I pretty much pronounce the l. St-aulk like tikindi said. Stock is with the sound in bother, for me.

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"Twixt me 'n thee..." blink.gif And Thee, thou, thine? hat happened to the good old you?

I think, technicaly, the thee, thou, thine predates you. And it's just the useage I was raised around. "This is mine, 'n that's thine" kinda thing. We do use you, you understand, it's just we also use the other variants as happily.

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What? When people say stalk and stock it's supposed to sound the same?

I pronounce stalk like 'stork' and stock just sounds like sock with a 't' in it tongue.gif

 

 

Does anyone else pronounce Katy and Katie differently?

 

I'd call them what ever they liked, but I think Katy is more American, here we use (and spell usually) Katie

Edited by Chiaki

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Does anyone else pronounce Katy and Katie differently?

 

I'd call them what ever they liked, but I think Katy is more American, here we use (and spell usually) Katie

 

I was talking about pronouniation. If a girl spells her name Katy, my voice goes down at the end, if she spelld it Katie, my voice goes up. I do the same for Lilly and Lilli.

 

I think, technicaly, the thee, thou, thine predates you. And it's just the useage I was raised around. "This is mine, 'n that's thine" kinda thing. We do use you, you understand, it's just we also use the other variants as happily.

I does, actually, but that doesn't change the fact that I have no dea when you should use thee and when you should use thou.

 

Ooh, 'nother random question. Does anyone else use the phrase, 'six one, half dozen the other'?

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I was talking about pronouniation. If a girl spells her name Katy, my voice goes down at the end, if she spelld it Katie, my voice goes up. I do the same for Lilly and Lilli.

I don't think I pronounce them differently, I think I just say them differently. Katy I say 'Cat-y' and Katie I say 'K-tee'

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I say 'K-tee' for both, but we got that voice pitch thingie. I think it's becacuse norwegian is pickier when it comes to pronounciation, and I've brought that along with me to my english. I know Saika does the same.

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I does, actually, but that doesn't change the fact that I have no dea when you should use thee and when you should use thou.

 

Well in Lancashire they both tend to come out as 'tha', as in "What did tha say the time were?", so I'm not sure I could help with that.

 

Ooh, 'nother random question. Does anyone else use the phrase, 'six one, half dozen the other'?

 

Yeah. Six of one and half a dozen of t'other is a phrase I use a fair amount. Along with knee high to a grasshopper to refer to childhood.

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I say, would you like a cup of tea?

 

guess where im from/

Britain or England? =V But I need to know which.

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Which part of the British Isles?

My ancestors used to be Celtic, so that's why...

 

When I'm nervous, I talk like the Nanny, Fran. It's because I was raised in NY for the first six years of my life.'

 

When I talk slowly, I sound kind of British. I often get asked if I come from Britain.

 

When I talk in German, I have a Spanish accent. (Sometimes in English too/trill my 'r's'.

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