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Accents

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People say that I have a Boston accent in my normal speech which is kinda odd considering I'm from Western NY. But outside of that, I can successfully pull off Irish, Scottish (Yes there actually is a difference), German, Russian accents and both King's English and Cockney English tones. And I'm not even an actor.

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While speaking Dutch, I can speak both ABN(Algemeen Beschaafd Nederlands, translated it means 'common civilized Dutch') and Limburgs(Limburg is a province in the Netherlands), which can be both an accent or a dialect. While you can hear I'm from Limburg, with me it's more underlying, because of my use of the 'r' and the 'g'. I can also use a preppy accent, a Drenths accent and a Frysian accent.

In English, I can both use an American and British accent, and I can also kick off a Scottish and an Irish accent.

 

There are a lot of accents I can use actually xd.png It's like a family trait, my father and sister can do it also. The moment we hear an accent, we can use it xd.png

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While speaking Dutch I have a very distinct accent, I'm from (Belgian) Limburg. People from the other parts of the country can always pick me out of a crowd, even pinpointing my accent with quite frightening accuracy. They say it sounds like we're constantly singing tongue.gif

I'm not sure what my accent sounds like when speaking English.

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I want to do an Australian accent SOOOOOO bad. However, I don't know anybody with one, and I have probably watched about an hour of videos on how to do one. I can't seem to, though. My real accent is pretty generic american (like New York, but not a Brooklyn or anything like that) with a little tiny bit of British awesomeness mixed into some words, but VERY VERY slight. Words like sand and pants. Most people don't notice it, but some people in the US will say it's a little funny. And I say I'm from the UK and people tell me I don't really have an accent like I should. My parents are american with accents, so thats why I think I get it. Also, I go to the US every summer so that only reinforces the American accent. Actually, I am pretty used to american accents and british accents, I can't really notice if somebody is american and british accents barely register with me. Unless it's really british, and I mean "ello mate" british. I can tell that easily.

 

EDIT: I can do I mean irish accent.

Edited by hibini

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I'm Australian, so, there ya go. I have one of the softer, clearer accents, compared to the harsher ones you can sometimes find. ( I think a lot of Queenslanders have the harder accent, any other Aussies agree? )

 

I will never understand how people get NZ and Aussie accents muddled up, they are ridiculously different. When I went to NZ a couple of years ago, my accent stuck out like nothing else.

 

I have heard that an Australian accent is very hard to do. I have seen so many Americans try and fail saying simple words. XD

 

Favourite accents..hmm, they'd probably have to be the South African accent ( I think it's really cute for some reason ) and also the softer English accents. And Irish accents of course.

Edited by Googleplaxin

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People say that I have a Boston accent in my normal speech which is kinda odd considering I'm from Western NY. But outside of that, I can successfully pull off Irish, Scottish (Yes there actually is a difference), German, Russian accents and both King's English and Cockney English tones. And I'm not even an actor.

Chortle! I cannot understand how anyone could confuse Scottish and Irish accents.

 

@ Hibini

Unless it's really british, and I mean "ello mate" british.

 

'ello mate' isn't 'really' British. It's a regional thing, mostly east London cockney though is seen in other areas as slang.

 

The stereotypical British is Received Pronunciation; think Steven Fry.

 

My own accent varies from RP (brought up abroad so was an ex pat), to Middlesbrough (soft Tyneside Geordie - where we came back to and where 2 of my brothers stayed so they have adopted that accent), to 'posh' Yorkshire (my dad before he died) and broad Tyke with my friends and workmates.

 

I'm a bit of mimic though. When I'm in the company of people with different accents, I automatically mimic them.

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I'm a bit of mimic though. When I'm in the company of people with different accents, I automatically mimic them.

Funny, I do that as well. My accent is broadly Sussex, with undertones of Lancashire normally. But if I'm spending time with a northerner the Lancashire starts to dominate, or if I'm spending time with anyone from the south pacific the New Zealand twang I picked up when we lived down there starts to creep in. Likewise if I'm in the US, or otherwise around Americans, then I get New England start to creep in to my accent. And lastly if I'm on the telephone (for some reason) or speaking to anyone vaugley upper-middle class I get the old Oxford RP turning up as that's my Mum's accent.

 

Side note - British is not one accent. It's many. British accents incorporate the various Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish dialects, as well as the many reigional variation in English accent. I'm guessing those saying 'British' are thinking the Hugh Grant style Received Pronunciation

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I am odd.

 

I speak with a Singaporean accent, mainly from the excessive use of Singlish.

 

Although I do try to get rid of it when I talk to foreigners... biggrin.gif

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Funny, I do that as well. My accent is broadly Sussex, with undertones of Lancashire normally. But if I'm spending time with a northerner the Lancashire starts to dominate, or if I'm spending time with anyone from the south pacific the New Zealand twang I picked up when we lived down there starts to creep in. Likewise if I'm in the US, or otherwise around Americans, then I get New England start to creep in to my accent. And lastly if I'm on the telephone (for some reason) or speaking to anyone vaugley upper-middle class I get the old Oxford RP turning up as that's my Mum's accent.

 

Side note - British is not one accent. It's many. British accents incorporate the various Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish dialects, as well as the many reigional variation in English accent. I'm guessing those saying 'British' are thinking the Hugh Grant style Received Pronunciation

Yep, that's what I mean. I have 5 friends who live in Bristol who I see a few times a year. Two of them have lived in Bristol all their lives so have the full Bristolian thing going on. Another is Welsh, one is a military brat so is pretty much RP and the last one is a Sarf Landon ex-pat. When we all go out my own accent changes depending on whom I am addressing, which sounds very strange to the casual observer.

 

One of my brothers ended up staying in Middlesbrough but married a girl from Ireland. He has a mixed up accent now of RP from our childhood, soft Geordie from living in Middlesbrough for twenty-five years, a slight Yorkshire hint from our dad and grandmother and Irish from his wife of fifteen years.

 

My youngest brother, who spent the least amount of time abroad and in Middlesbrough of all us, has a very broad Yorkshire accent now.

 

My husband always laughs at me though if I am arguing with someone. Apparently I go straight into upper class RP mode and become Penelope Keith of To the Manor Born!

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Oh yes! I love british, australian, and jamaican accects! I'm sure there are other's, but can't think of them now. ha ha

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My husband always laughs at me though if I am arguing with someone. Apparently I go straight into upper class RP mode and become Penelope Keith of To the Manor Born!

Funny, isn't it, how RP seems to come out strongest when you're ticked off. I wonder if it only happens to those of us that were brought up with it being spoken in the house?

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Funny, isn't it, how RP seems to come out strongest when you're ticked off. I wonder if it only happens to those of us that were brought up with it being spoken in the house?

My husband says I am very intimidating when I am like that!

 

In my early childhood that was pretty much all I heard around me. Most ex-pat kids (and military brats) don't end up with accents, so that's what you end up picking up RP from teachers etc.

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I have a generic american accent. Although when I talk to people with accents I end up mimicing them for a bit until I hear another accent. Some times it seems when I talk really fast I have a slight british accent. Kinda.

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I've lived in NC forever, and I have that country/southern drawl going on... lol

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I've lived in Texas/Arkansas all my life, so yeah, I have a Southern accent. It isn't the extreme Southern accent you sometimes hear, but it is noticeable.

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Cheryl Cole sacked 'over accent'

 

CHERYL Cole was dropped from the US version of "The X Factor" because audiences cannot understand her accent.

 

Britain has been left fuming after pop star Cole, a major celebrity in the UK, appears to have been discarded from the show less than a month after arriving in the US, and well before it hits TV screens in September.

 

There was no official confirmation from the show's host television network, Fox, but a "close friend" told The Sun tabloid that she was "shocked and stunned" and she "never saw it coming".

 

Cole is from Newcastle in northeast England, which has one of the country's strongest accents, and has admitted in the past that some Americans took time to adapt to her Geordie brogue.

 

user posted image

 

"I've got a lot of American friends and we have the odd moments where they're like, 'What? What did that mean?' - you know, a phrase," she said.

 

"But I'm proud of my accent."

 

Cole, 27, had a string of platinum-selling hits and was a judge on the British version of "The X Factor" before British TV mogul Simon Cowell offered her a chance to be a judge on the new US version, alongside singer Paula Abdul.

 

British newspapers, with tongue firmly tucked in cheek, said the timing of the snub was ironic because it came just days after US President Barack Obama reaffirmed the importance of the US-British 'special relationship'.

 

The Times even produced an entire editorial written in phonetic 'Geordie', including the line: "They sez they couldn't understand what Ah wez saying. Darlings, Ah can hardly understand what I'm saying mesel horf the time."

 

Cole was formerly married to Chelsea and England footballer Ashley Cole, but the couple split up last year.

 

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/world/cheryl-cole-s...r-1226064433445

 

Ouch!

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You guys ever seen the El pollo Loco commercials with that mexican guy and hsi smooth accent? well thats not mine. but i do have a mexican accent and it changes depending on what language i am speaking. thsi is mainly because i love asian people and spend so much time with them that i imitate them =[

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Ouch!

On the one hand I pity the poor girl - and on the other I find it rather funny. Goes a long way to helping dispel the myth that there's one 'British' accent. Although I do wonder why they didn't just do what I've seen other US programmes do to people with heavy accents and sub-title her.

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Britain has been left fuming after pop star Cole, a major celebrity in the UK...

 

I'm fuming on two accounts:

 

i) I couldn't actually care less.

 

ii) I'm offended she counts as a major celebrity.

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On the one hand I pity the poor girl - and on the other I find it rather funny. Goes a long way to helping dispel the myth that there's one 'British' accent. Although I do wonder why they didn't just do what I've seen other US programmes do to people with heavy accents and sub-title her.

Usually shows like that are focused on certain groups of people with heavy accents... Like the show "Swamp People" has subtitles because Cajun accents make it seem like you're speaking portuguese to a spaniard. You get the gist of it, but you're still missing about a third of the words...

 

With her... she's more of a host/judge... the show isn't focused on her, and she's supposed to give much needed info not only to the participants, but also to the viewers (to contrast their ideas about how they think the participants did).

 

Plus, if any aspect of this show is going to be live... try subtitling that...

 

And plus, people are lazy... most of the time when subtitles come on shows for accents, it's a news show or documentary (usually of the "slice of life of X profession" variety)

 

I'm fuming on two accounts:

 

i) I couldn't actually care less.

 

ii) I'm offended she counts as a major celebrity.

 

But you MUST be fuming, the story says you are. tongue.gif

 

-K-

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I love all the different accents that come around from my area of the south, down here by New Orleans. Whenever I get upset or angry I get this southern twang in my voice, that is actually kind of odd for the area I'm around.

 

A lot of my relatives have that koonass accent. Several of my Aunts sound like their straight out Jersey.

 

I love it when my b/f gets a call from his parents. Without even thinking about it he starts getting that thick Cajun accent, that mixes in just a touch of french that makes it hard for most people to understand. I adore it.

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No accent for me, but I do have the ability to impersonate a bunch of different accents (including people I know and on TV) laugh.gif

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I guess you can say I don't have an accent. I'm in Florida. I looove British and Australian accents, though.

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I'm originally from South Africa, so here in Australia everyone just goes xd.png over my apparent 'accent'. I don't think it's that typical Afrikaans-English, choppy way of talking (think District 9), but it's kind of been warped into a strange American one from too much TV. Maybe in a few years I'll have an Aussie one biggrin.gif

 

My favorite accent would have to be French. We had an exchange student, I installed cameras everywhere (kidding, but it was nice listening to).

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