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maustin89

Computer and tech talk and questions

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smile.gif Thank you Omega Entity! I haven't tried it yet. If the blue screen of Death appears, I'll take a photo of it. The PC is still working but tends to hang up so I'm using iPad for the moment. It's kinda strange since we just had the CPU fixed but the screen obtained that blue vertical line. >_> What a waste of money.

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More questions!

 

First off, are you using a separate graphics card, or on-board? The hookups for a separate card will likely be horizontal unless it's a micro case, or vertical if it's the on-board graphics card built into the motherboard.

 

Second, does the blue line show up after booting the OS, or is it present during the BIOS loadup screen when you first turn it on?

 

If it's an issue with the graphics card or monitor, it won't have anything to do with the actual CPU. If it's the card going bad, it could also possibly explain the system hangs as well.

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The line shows after booting the OS. It's not there when on but appears when the Microsoft logo appears.

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Alright, so it's only there during the Windows loading screen, but disappears after? Let me do a bit more research, and see if I can't narrow it down.

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Ah, alright. Yeah, definitely sounds like a graphics card issue, though there is always a chance I'm wrong since i can't look at it. On the plus side, they can be pretty cheap to replace, and they're ridiculously easy to install if you decide to try it yourself.

 

What's your specs, and do you use your machine for gaming at all? I can let you know what kind you'll need, if you want smile.gif

Edited by Omega Entity

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I suppose I have to analyse all these tips you gave me and fix it when sem break comes. Currently busy with school work at the mean time since it's nearing the end of the sem.

 

Sorry, I didn't get to capture a photo of the BSOD. I was still opening the camera of my iPad when the BSOD passed by.

 

I use my PC for school work but sometimes I play games that are simple like Plants vs. Zombies. I don't play games that are fast paced like DoTA that lag tends to be very annoying.

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Alright. If you don't do much gaming, then a new graphics card can pretty inexpensive. Hopefully your BSoDs are from that, and you can kill two birds with one stone smile.gif

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Honestly, georgexu94's problems sound more like driver problems than hardware problems to me. I would try updating your drivers. If you don't know how to do that, this might be helpful.

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Except driver issues don't generally cause visual artifacts on the screen.

 

In any case, drivers are a good place to start, though. But I still think it's an issue with the card itself.

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So, I'm looking to build my first gaming PC. I haven't done this before, so I'm looking for tips on building, suggestions on brands, specific models you recommend, sample builds, etc.

 

I'd like to spend around $2000. To give an idea of the use, I do not plan on overclocking (I wouldn't know what I'm doing and wouldn't want to risk wrecking something), I plan to stream/record video while I am playing, and I take lots and lots of screenshots (I have around 40GB for Elder Scrolls Online alone so far).

 

I'm thinking an Intel CPU, because from what I've been reading, those sound better for the higher-end stuff. (Specifically, I've kinda been looking at the Intel Core i5-4690K mostly, and dunno about how different the Intel Core i7-4790K is.) I'm thinking maybe 16GB RAM. As far as the case, people have recommended to me to get a full size one.

 

So, here are my questions -

- I know motherboard should match the CPU, but there's quite a few different compatible ones. What should I look for in deciding what one I want? Any specific brands you like, and why?

- SSD or hard drive, or both? Is it worth the expensive cost to get SSD, and if so, how big?

- I have absolutely no idea what sort of graphics card to go for. This is probably the biggest thing I'm concerned about, because I know that it's one of the things that has the biggest effect on the performance of a game, and there's just SO much out there.

- How much higher should the wattage of a power supply be than the estimated amount the machine will use? For example, I was playing around on PCPartsPicker and it estimated it at 725W. What wattage power supply should I get?

- Tips on fans/cooling? How many, where should they go in the case?

- Is there anything you wish you would have done differently when you built yours?

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The higher-end Intels were outperforming the AMD equivalent, last I checked. The i-series ones are great. If you're going to do a lot of video work, it might be worth it to splurge on the i7 (especially if you're going to be doing a lot of resource-intensive video editing), though you could -probably- get away with a higher-end i5.

 

If you're building your own, full-size is the way to go case-wise. It'll give you plenty of room to both add on, and it'll make it that much easier to cram stuff in in the first place with the added benefit of giving you space to work.

 

On motherboards, it really depends on how much you want to spend, versus how long you want to be able to upgrade the thing. I myself prefer ASUS on my boards, simply because in my experience they've always been solid boards - my laptop is probably at least 10 years old, but it's still limping along. Look for at least 3.0 PCI-e, x2 if you plan on SLI/Crossfiring dual graphics cards (and make sure if you are, the board supports it). Some extra PCIs are always nice of a few extras - I plan on adding an additional soundcard to mine when funds allow, and I also have a card that's added 3 more SATA2 ports too my innards. I also have an addition fan in there to help keep things nice and cool. You'll also want to make sure you have enough slots for RAM, and pay attention to how much total RAM the board will support - it's what will be the final determination of how much you can add, since the potential is exponential on the later 64-bit Windows OSes. Pay attention also to the -speed- of the RAM you'll be using versus the board's supported speeds, as paying extra for super-fast RAM will give you no added benefit if the board only supports a lower speed. it'll still work, mind you, but the RAM will only run at the speed which the board allows.

 

As for RAM, the more the merrier. 16GB is plenty, but why stop there, especially if you're running video? RAM is pretty inexpensive nowadays anyway, so it won't hurt your wallet too badly to bump that up to 32GB. 4 slots seems to be the sweet spot for me, as far as the board goes.

 

SSD versus hard drive - for optimum performance, you can get an SSD for your OS, and use hard drives for the bulk of your storage. that way, you don't have to dish out a ton for relatively little space on an SSD. Another thing to remember with SSDs is that their performance degrades the more times you overwrite data, which is why you're really only want them for OS and program files rather than any kind of regular storage. Plus, stangard hard drives are pretty dang cheap, and do the job just fine for basic storage. The only thing you'd be sacrificing is speed, which can be somewhat mitigated by a high-RPM HDD.

 

Graphics cards - this is another case of 'how much do you want to spend'. Rather than spend a ton on one card, it might work better to buy a pair of identical ones that allow for SLI or Crossfire functions. You'll also want to make sure your cards will run with whatever On my rig, I'm running a GeForce 750 Ti card - 2GB GDDR5, 3.0 PCI-e card and it handles everything I throw at it beautifully, though I admittedly haven't tossed anything truly massive at it yet, though I doubt it'll have much issue.

 

Power supply - I think I'm running around 700 on mine, which is probably more than I need, but it's entirely better to be over prepared than under, since you can do some damage to your component that way.

 

Fans - you can have as many as you want in your case, or even go with liquid cooling. There's no such thing as too many fans, IMO, since proper cooling is so important for the lifespan of your parts. There's likely pics of people's setups out there with their preferred fan positioning.

 

What would I have done differently... more hard drives (I'm a packrat!), and definately more RAM. I'm running fine on 8 GB, but I'd like to boost up to 16GB, and ideally 32GB. I probably don't need it, but hey, why not? Oh, and a separate sound card. I want audiogasms!

Edited by Omega Entity

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I am looking for a laptop under $1000 with good graphic that live longer than 4, 5 years. Is there some brand that anyone recommend? I would only play one game (Tera) on it and most of the time is just surfing of the internet. I tired customized laptop but it was a miss, an infected RAM and a dysfunctional SSD... in 6 months. I know I am not knowledgeable enough to tweak with laptops.

 

So is there a brand that you would recommend, or even a specific laptop series? smile.gif

 

--------

long life

good graphic

long battery life

good cooling system

Those are the main things I want for a decent laptop.

 

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ASUS makes laptops, as well as a lot of other things. My laptop by them is still kicking after 10 years. My desktop built with one of their boards lasted for 6 or 7, right up until I decided to upgrade my hardware entirely.

 

MSI also makes some impressive gaming laptops for around $1000. My advice would be to look around at some reviews, starting with those brands.

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I have a question. Of there are instances where I cannot open my PC, then how can I operate the Malware scan?

 

Edited: Omega Entity, I need your guidance. I did a hyper scan and found this:

user posted image

 

I held it quarantine. I deleted the quarantine afterwards. Is the threat gone or no? What does quarantine mean anyway? What if I click restore as opposed to delete or ignore it?

 

Edited: If you look closely, you can see the vertical blue line I'm talking about. I apologise for the photo being blurry. xd.png I captured it using my iPad. I stand corrected. The blue line appears right from the start when the screen is on NOT when the logo appears. So I guess the problem is with the video card. However, how did that happen? It was only like that when we checked it after the technician 'fixed' it. In my opinion, the technician makes it worse than it is and never fixed anything. The BSOD still appears anyway.

Edited by georgexu94

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Once you quarantine and delete the problem file, it -should- be gone unless it's a serious infection. Your scan actually looks pretty clean - a lot of potentially maliciousfiles show up as Trojans, but most are relatively harmless. Some files aren't even malicious, just show up suspicious to the program, so there's no need to panic just because the scan finds something. The truly bad ones are those that seriously slow down your system or ipede functionality.

 

Now, if you ever get an infection that prevents you from opening programs, you can usually boot into safe mode and do it then, since most of -those- infections are only fully functional when running Windows normally. You can usually enter safe mode by spamming F8 during the boot up sequence. If the system makes it to the Windows loading screen, then you were too slow (or it's a different key than F8 on your system). I usually do safe mode with networking, just in case I need the internet for anything. If you remove the infection, reboot, and it turns back up again, it means it's in the registry and you'll need to use a stronger removal program.

 

As for the lines being there from the beginning... Hm. Your drivers shouldn't be a factor at all during boot up, since those don't come into play until Windows boots, which still points to hardware. You mentioned you just got it back, so double check your cables and make sure they're seated properly.

Second, let's check and make sure it's not the monitor, if you have another one around. Simply plug in another monitor and see if the line's still there. If the depending on your settings and the restrictions on such on the test monitor, you may need to change your resolution settings to do this. If there's no lines, then it's the monitor. If there are, then we're still looking at a driver card issue.

 

That the lines comes up from the getgo still makes me think hardware, since I'm not sure that the drivers even load in until you get to the Windows screen.

Edited by Omega Entity

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smile.gif Thank you so much. Just curious, I already know about the safe mode but what exactly does it do? i.e. What is the difference between running Windows normally?

 

I don't have any other monitor in the house that is functioning properly. So, I'm not sure is there another way to see? Also, I'm not sure how to change the resolution with this monitor. I am less accustomed to it. The former monitor got those buttons for changing the brightness, resolution, etc. this one seems to only have the On/Off button.

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Safe mode makes the pc run with minimal files and drivers to minimize conflicts so you can fix something that prevents Windows from booting normally. Some programs are unavailable to use in safe mode because of this. It's essentially a troubleshooting mode.

 

Resolution - you can adjust the resolution your card outputs via the control panel and visual settings, which is preferable to doing it via the monitor since the test monitor will take the pc's settings, not to the monitor attached before. You'll want to lower the resolution to ensure the test monitor can handle your pc's output.

 

You could replace the graphics card first, but it won't solve your problem if the monitor proves to be the issue. So it's really important to try and secure another monitor. Does a friend have one they can bring over, maybe?

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Except driver issues don't generally cause visual artifacts on the screen.

Driver problems can absolutely cause visual artifacts. I've seen it happen in several cases before where updating the drivers fixed the problem.

 

I'd agree with finding a way to test the monitor. I'm really not seeing flags for GPU hardware problems.

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I'm not saying drivers can't, just that in my experience it was usually the card.

 

Anyway, yeah, since the lines are present from the get go, the monitor looks like the likely suspect.

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Once you quarantine and delete the problem file, it -should- be gone unless it's a serious infection. Your scan actually looks pretty clean -

^^; Actually, the programme found five thingies. That's just the photo at the start. It found Backdoor.Farfli too. And that is only at my Hard drive C.

Edited by georgexu94

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Still nothing to worry about. You'd freak if you knew how many objects I've had on a scan before, and still no noticeable effect on the functionality of the system tongue.gif

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Still nothing to worry about. You'd freak if you knew how many objects I've had on a scan before, and still no noticeable effect on the functionality of the system tongue.gif

laugh.gif Apologies. Sometimes people get scared for something they are not familiar with. I tend to over react because of that. biggrin.gif Thanks for all your help!

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@ Dawnwing - Anytime! I certainly don't know everything there is to know, but I like to try to be helpful when I can :-)

 

@georgexu94 - Same thing, anytime! Drop me more messages when you have questions. I might not answer immediately, but I'll get there, haha.

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