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TheDarkCynder

Rats, Ferrets, Snakes, other exotic animals.

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Well the best way to tes with you do have venom or if its a dry bite is by squeazing it and tasting it.

This is a complete myth.

 

Saying you have venomous snakes that bite you and its fine, is like me saying I have a bear that mauls me all the time, but its okay because my parents are doctors.

 

Practically everything you have said about venomous snakes is 100% untrue, and I am entirely sure you have never worked with them, and are probably sayingthis for attention or whatnot. If this was even remotely true, you would have died a long time ago. The first rule all hot snake keepers go by, is to never even give the snake the tiniest chance to bite you, no matter how 'tame' it might seem. "tasting" a bite, or pulling the snake off quickly is ridiculous and will do absolutely nothing to help you.

 

Also to the person saying you can't own black mambas, you can buy them for a few hundred if you know where to look.

 

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Well the best way to tes with you do have venom or if its a dry bite is by squeazing it and tasting it.

Tasting it, are you serious? For all you know, you could be taking in venom.

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Tasting it, are you serious? For all you know, you could be taking in venom.

Venom is harmless if you eat it, but can still mess you up if you have tiny cuts in your mouth. (which is super common).

 

Also, cobra bites use tiger snake antivenom to be treated, which runs about $500 a vial. A decent cobra bite can take 20 vials to treat, and then there is added medical costs from the immediate damage cobra venom does, hospital visits, etc etc.

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Oh. Well, I don't know a lot about snakes. I just know that Black Mambas are fast and poisonous and the average person probably wouldn't want one in their house. I know I wouldn't. xd.png Aren't they the fastest snake in the world or something? Not the best idea to toy with that.

One of my parent's friends friends (yeah, that sounded awkward... xd.png) had a poisonous snake...um...rattler, I think (but I'm not positive), and it got out of its cage. My parent's friend somehow had it in a glass tank in the back of her truck. I'm not completely sure how that happened, though. Or how they caught it... xd.png I think the friend of my parent's friend said she was going to give it to some nature place so they could release it into the wild.

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I have a baby Alligator Gar. 8 inches long. Hes still young, though. He isn't even a juvenile yet. Im planning on getting another, but, much older and larger.

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I only have Jelly, Belly(Lion-head rabbits) and Bean the Jersey Wooly.

My dad says that when our basement is done, we're getting a Alligator Gar.

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I had three ferrets, 2 males and 1 female that I re-homed a few years ago. They were the sweetest little Slinky Faeries. I'm currently craving a few ratties, but I don't have the time or funds. tongue.gif

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I don't own any currently but I use to own a ferret named Snow Top and my sister has a chinchilla (yet to be named). Oh and I had a snake named angle too.

Edited by Dragoness_Rita

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Two people getting gator gars?

I briefly had a 2 inch long baby, you guys do know how big they get, right?

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Does this count as a pet?

There's an alligator at this state park we visit. It's not exactly 'penned in', but there's a fence so it doesn't wander onto the road. A bridge goes above the area they're in (it's natural, not fake, just like a fence built around a natural area, but there is a fountain installed in the lake) and there's an alligator that lives there. I named him Chad. My mom thinks he's my boyfriend. laugh.gif

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A 6-year-old female corn snake and an 11-year-old male ball python. Nothing too dangerous. The corn snake does seem convinced that she's a rattler, though. She'll rattle her little tail when she's mad and attacks her (prekilled, lol) mice as though she thinks she's the deadliest predator the world has seen. :P

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do hermit crabs count? i had 3 for a few years... oh and also i had some guppies that are from the amazon, and ghost shrimp, and this exotic snail-thing

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I raise white doves if that counts as exotic...

I also have a snake and a rabbit and a red ear slider turtle

 

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I have a cute bearded dragon called Darwin! He's the son of dragonlass666's beardies and dragonlass' family also own a Maine Coon cat, several other types of lizard, countless snakes and a couple of tarantulas and matises. ;-)

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Two people getting gator gars?

I briefly had a 2 inch long baby, you guys do know how big they get, right?

I'm fully aware of how large they can get. I can easily provide for them. I don't recommend them for beginners. An easier Gar to have would be the Spotted Gar.

Im also getting 2 Mudskippers and 4 Archer fish

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I'm fully aware of how large they can get. I can easily provide for them. I don't recommend them for beginners. An easier Gar to have would be the Spotted Gar.

Im also getting 2 Mudskippers and 4 Archer fish

Ooh, a fellow large fish keeper? biggrin.gif

 

What sort of setup are you gonna have? ;o

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Ooh, a fellow large fish keeper? biggrin.gif

 

What sort of setup are you gonna have? ;o

For the skippers; A 10 gallon tank with floating driftwood, play sand[to stimulate a natural enviorment], semi-large rocks, plastic plants. The skippers are babies. The archers arent. Mudskippers need brackish conditions when fully grown. At the size they are at now... They'd be a snack for the archers. They'll be in the 10 gallon til' they are 6 inches long, in which case they'll be moved to the Mangrove Brackish tank.

For the gar: Hes been doing fine in the 75 gallon. Hes 8 inches long, so still a wee baby. There are no obsticles in his tank aside from a plastic driftwood object and a Collossum ruin cave, which are where the pleco are convicts are. Hes left alone and is fed minnows, goldfish and the occasonal pinkie mouse as a once a month snack. When he reaches 4 feet he'll be moved into a a man-made pond in my basement, which has been re-done as my study/school work area. The pond holds 150 gallons of water and takes up a large segment of the basement. It's renforced with acrylic glass at the rim. This is to prevent him from jumping out. The ground of the pond is a mix of mud and rock, as we do have live plants in there. There is no other decorations. This way he has swimming room.

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For the skippers; A 10 gallon tank with floating driftwood, play sand[to stimulate a natural enviorment], semi-large rocks, plastic plants. The skippers are babies. The archers arent. Mudskippers need brackish conditions when fully grown. At the size they are at now... They'd be a snack for the archers. They'll be in the 10 gallon til' they are 6 inches long, in which case they'll be moved to the Mangrove Brackish tank.

For the gar: Hes been doing fine in the 75 gallon. Hes 8 inches long, so still a wee baby. There are no obsticles in his tank aside from a plastic driftwood object and a Collossum ruin cave, which are where the pleco are convicts are. Hes left alone and is fed minnows, goldfish and the occasonal pinkie mouse as a once a month snack. When he reaches 4 feet he'll be moved into a a man-made pond in my basement, which has been re-done as my study/school work area. The pond holds 150 gallons of water and takes up a large segment of the basement. It's renforced with acrylic glass at the rim. This is to prevent him from jumping out. The ground of the pond is a mix of mud and rock, as we do have live plants in there. There is no other decorations. This way he has swimming room.

Er, 150 gallons isn't going to be near enough for even a 4 foot long fish. The water will turn toxic within a couple of days (I have a 2 foot long remora in a 210 gallon, and bioload wise him and a few snails are pushing it), and no matter the dimensions, a 4 foot long fish wouldn't even have room to physically turn around.

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Cool topic! I'm living in a very small apartment and can't have any pet that I can't keep in a cage or a tank. I'm going to get a Beta fish because I love how flashy they can be, but I'm really thinking about getting either a long haired mouse or a teddy-bear hamster or something.

 

I haven't looked completely through this thread yet (it's long!) but may I ask the rodent owners out there what they might advise someone who's only as far as doing research yet? smile.gif

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Cool topic! I'm living in a very small apartment and can't have any pet that I can't keep in a cage or a tank. I'm going to get a Beta fish because I love how flashy they can be, but I'm really thinking about getting either a long haired mouse or a teddy-bear hamster or something.

 

I haven't looked completely through this thread yet (it's long!) but may I ask the rodent owners out there what they might advise someone who's only as far as doing research yet? smile.gif

A good rule of thumb is to see how the rodent reacts to you before you buy it. If it's not stressed or sick and has been raised to accept humans, it should be friendly and inquisitive with bright eyes and a nice shiny coat. Check for shredded ears and kinked tail; those are signs that it's in an overpopulated cage/tank or that there are territory disputes and it's being beaten up on. Dull coat, cloudy, or crusted-shut eyes means they're overstressed (from too many in an enclosure) or sick. If it shies from you or tries to bite; watch out. It hasn't been taught to enjoy human companionship and may not bond with you.

 

See if you can check out the enclosure as well. Is it dirty or clean? Does it seem like a lot of animals in a small space, or are they separated pretty well? Can you see any sick or injured animals? Those kinds of things will tell you how the store/breeder treats their supply which might let you know if there may be problems with how your new pet sees you. If the cages are all dirty, that might mean that they're all under a lot of stress or even sick. If there's any visibly sick, injured, or pregnant animals, it means the breeder/store isn't separating them like they should.

 

Those are good rules for any rodent. Also specific rodents it's better to get two than one. Rats and gerbils are the ones I can think of immediately; and it's better to get two males than two females. Typically for rodents males are more laidback and easier to befriend while females are more hyper and skittish and may take some coaxing. Gerbil males will rarely fight, while gerbil females may fight each other to the death over the visiting rights of a male, which is another thing you want to think about.

 

Rats can be really good pets but I wouldn't recommend them for a first time rodent owner just because they're a bit more intelligent and would require a bit more care than something like a gerbil. Gerbils make good beginner pets, and if you can track down a good teddy-bear hamster that isn't flighty or nippy I'd say go for it. Mice aren't really good for beginners either as they can be strangely neurotic, hyper as all getout, and can get very nippy and stinky if you drop the ball even just a little bit, which you will probably do more than once when first starting out (and that's normal!)

 

 

 

Now the cost is what's going to surprise you. Rodents usually are between $2 and $20 from a pet store, more from a breeder (though you're more likely to get a good personality and healthier pet). The animal itself, then, is fairly inexpensive. A cage that's a good size for two hamsters/gerbils will cost you about $50 or more unless the prices have varied since I last owned my rodents. Rat cages will be significantly more expensive; ranging $70 - $150. I've even seen some rat cages go over $300, though that was for more than two.

 

You will need some sort of chewing material, and the first month or so with your new pet will tell you what they like to chew and how fast they go through it, so be prepared to buy more things for them to tear apart. An excersise wheel is a must, as is a runabout ball which would let them safely roll around outside of their cage (while supervised!). Once you develop more of a bond you can let them sit on your shoulders or scamper around the desk/bed, but at first you want to be careful. Places to hide are nice, especially when they first go into a new home. Try to find inexpensive but nice bedding. Nothing too smelly or dusty, no ripped up newspaper. Personally my favorite has been that recycled wood-pulp bedding with some tissues added so they could sleep on something soft.

 

As for food it depends if you regularly plan on giving them treats. Find something that's balanced and not too fatty; that is something that has seeds (fatty!) but also good food (like pellets). Certain seeds, alfalfa, and yogurt drops are good treats, and depending on the rodent you can give them very small amounts of fruits or veggies. My gerbils enjoyed the ends of banana peels and the stems from apples and pears the best.

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Er, 150 gallons isn't going to be near enough for even a 4 foot long fish. The water will turn toxic within a couple of days (I have a 2 foot long remora in a 210 gallon, and bioload wise him and a few snails are pushing it), and no matter the dimensions, a 4 foot long fish wouldn't even have room to physically turn around.

My last Alligator gar did fine in a 150 gallon tank. He died, due to choking. He tried to eat one of the koi in the tank.

My current gar is doing fine, and ill suspect he'd do fine in the pond. Its deep, but LOOKs shallow.

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