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Nakase

Project Default

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I do have a couple things you can use for this. I haven't gotten anything finished from my spritework to use for this, but

user posted image this is my original watercolor, which I was using for an avatar for awhile. It's not dragons, but Flower Fairies. It's also not square. I don't know if that makes it so you can't use it. However, if you would like to use it, I'm giving full permission for it to be used on this site and for DC merchandise. (though, since it's not dragons....)

 

Also, the avatar that I used when I first came to the site is one I have used frequently. I did not do the original artwork. My daughter did. It's a 7 x 10 pastel painting she "tossed off" for me. I have obtained her full permission to use this as an avatar here, and for DC's Cafepress store.

user posted image

 

Obviously, this one isn't square either. It's lovely though, isn't it? She did another one too, but it's even less square than that one.

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I do have a couple things you can use for this. I haven't gotten anything finished from my spritework to use for this, but

user posted image this is my original watercolor, which I was using for an avatar for awhile. It's not dragons, but Flower Fairies. It's also not square. I don't know if that makes it so you can't use it. However, if you would like to use it, I'm giving full permission for it to be used on this site and for DC merchandise. (though, since it's not dragons....)

 

Also, the avatar that I used when I first came to the site is one I have used frequently. I did not do the original artwork. My daughter did. It's a 7 x 10 pastel painting she "tossed off" for me. I have obtained her full permission to use this as an avatar here, and for DC's Cafepress store.

user posted image

 

Obviously, this one isn't square either. It's lovely though, isn't it? She did another one too, but it's even less square than that one.

I edited it to add more space to both sides, then reuploaded it.

user posted image©Fiona BlueFire

 

Um..I dunno about the flower fairies :\ I think this is supposed to be dragons >_> or themes from the Cave.

(It's pretty though)

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Yes, I didn't know about the Flower Fairies either. But it's easy enough to take down if it isn't going to be used.

 

So, square is important for the avatars? I can make them square....

 

though it's fine that you did already. smile.gif

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Yes, I didn't know about the Flower Fairies either. But it's easy enough to take down if it isn't going to be used.

 

So, square is important for the avatars? I can make them square....

 

though it's fine that you did already. smile.gif

oh, sorry :\ I can take them down if you'd like to do that...I just put them on a 100x100 background then made the bg transparent. I didn't change the size of the picture otherwise.

 

EDIT: We're half way there guys!!!! yay!!! keep it up biggrin.gif

Edited by Nakase

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Oooh! Love the new one!

 

Ok, I love my treasure dragon, but here's an avi with him. xd.png

user posted image

Edited by Zovesta

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Ah! So it's LadyLyzar I have to thank for my Awesomeness-in-a-Jar beneath my forum name. wub.gif

 

These are all very beautiful. I wish I had the painting/drawing talent to help you all. sad.gif Unfortunately the most I can do is take an image and recolor it, so I doubt that will be of help. xd.png

 

Just to add comments, I also thought the 2 silvers was a bit.... awkward. An easy fix would be to have it where the female's head was clearly on the outside of the male's leg. Right now it looks more like.... well, you know. Considering its a drawing/painting, I don't know if it can be altered or not. Still, it's a gorgeous drawing, as are the others. smile.gif

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No, it's fine Nakase. I just hadn't made them square myself because I didn't realize that they needed to be. I thought if one direction was 100 pixels and the other was not more than that they were fine.

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I had tried to use a avatar that had a shorted side, and when I used it the foum stretched it o_0 so I assumed it had to be 100x100 for it to stay in the correct dimensions :\

 

OH WOW!!! Tha avatars are already in use guys/gals!!! lookit!!! xDDDD Keep it up everyone, this is doing wonders for the forum!!

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Easy way to prevent streching is to add transparency to both sides

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I may contribute. No promises though, since I seem to forget a lot of purely art projects. Sprites I get around to, but art I seem to subtly forget.

 

I do have a sketch I'd like to try and contribute to this, though it needs some fixing-up.

 

Not my animated one though, since that's mine. *greedy* Anyways, it was a collab between a friend and me, so I'd have to ask their permission to release it publicly.

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Hey guys/gals,

 

Someone was asking about the rights to these avatars and if they could alter them. Personally, I don't want anyone altering my artwork since it's in my online gallery.(or will be shortly)

 

They want to know, and was wondering if they are under creative commons license or not.

 

The avatars I did/worked on, are not. I would want a lawyer to read the fine print before I agree to something like that.

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I don't like the idea of allowing anyone to alter any of the avatars we made... As we made it for the fourms and no where else.

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I have a number of dragon head shots of some OCs drawn, and I plan to colour them digitally once I've finished all 8. I'll upload some of the better ones once they're finished if no-one minds.

(On the subject of colouring those, one of them has a mother of pearl sheen to her scales. If an experienced artist would be willing to teach me how to do that effect once I start on her, would they please let me know via PM?)

 

Also, I have an old drawing of an adult skywing and an adult magi (Both in one pic) and would like to know whether I would be able to submit it as a piece for here? If not I'll possibly not bother redoing it so it's avatar worthy. I looked at the art usage form but I'm not 100% sure it would be allowed.

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Since we made them specifically for this site and for TJ to use only on the DC merchandise then I'd say that they are under a restricted license that is authorized to the respective artists and TJ only. Any use or modification by others in a marketing standpoint could be considered infringement upon the usage of those who are authorized to use the image and would damage the profitability for the site when marketing merchandise with the images.

 

Altering the works would also create an issue in that, as far as I know, all artists here have clearly stated in this thread or over in the permissions sticky what can and can not be done with their art.

 

Creative commons license.... I'd have to read carefully. However every image is already copyrighted to their respective artist and this is covered there.

 

Note: I'm looking up Creative Commons License now

 

 

Edit: This will be long. No summary will be given. SO READ IT.

Creative Commons License:

 

Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share. The organization has released several copyright licenses known as Creative Commons licenses. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators.

 

Types of Creative Commons licenses

 

Creative Commons licenses contain four major permissions:

 

* Attribution (by) requires users to attribute a work's original author. All Creative Commons licenses contain this option, but some now-deprecated licenses did not contain this component.

* Authors can either not restrict modification, or use Share-alike (sa), which is a copyleft requirement that requires that any derived works be licensed under the same license, or No derivatives (nd), which requires that the work not be modified.

* Non-commercial (nc) requires that the work not be used for commercial purposes.

 

As of the current versions, all Creative Commons licenses allow the "core right" to redistribute a work for non-commercial purposes without modification. The Non-commercial and No derivatives options will make a work non-free.

 

Criticism

 

Matteo Pasquinelli (2008) describes two fronts of criticism: "those who claim the institution of a real commonality against Creative Commons restrictions (non-commercial, share-alike, etc.)[clarification needed] and those who point out Creative Commons complicity with global capitalism".[clarification needed] Pasquinelli specifically criticises Creative Commons for not establishing "productive commons".[clarification needed]

 

Critics have also argued that Creative Commons worsens license proliferation, by providing multiple licenses that are incompatible. Most notably 'attribution-sharealike' and 'attribution-noncommercial-sharealike' are incompatible, meaning that works under these licenses cannot be combined in a derivative work without obtaining permission from the license-holder. Pro-copyright commentators from within the content industry argue either that Creative Commons is not useful, or that it undermines copyright.

 

Some within the copyleft movement argue that only the Attribution-ShareAlike license is actually a true copyleft license and that there is no standard of freedom between Creative Commons licenses (as there is, for example, within the free software and open source movements). An effort within the movement to define a standard of freedom has resulted in the Definition of Free Cultural Works. In February 2008, Creative Commons recognized the definition and added an "Approved for Free Cultural Works" badge to its two Creative Commons licenses which comply—Attribution and Attribution-ShareAlike.

 

Additional research found this:

 

Creative Commons licenses are several copyright licenses released on December 16, 2002 by Creative Commons, a U.S. non-profit corporation founded in 2001.

 

Many of the licenses, notably all the original licenses, grant certain "baseline rights", such as the right to distribute the copyrighted work without changes, at no charge. Some of the newer licenses do not grant these rights.

 

Creative Commons licenses are currently available in 43 different jurisdictions worldwide, with more than nineteen others under development. Licenses for jurisdictions outside of the United States are under the purview of Creative Commons International.

 

Original licenses

 

The original set of licenses all grant the "baseline rights". The details of each of these licenses depends on the version, and comprises a selection of four conditions:

 

* Attribution Attribution (by): Licensees may copy, distribute, display and perform the work and make derivative works based on it only if they give the author or licensor the credits in the manner specified by these.

* Non-commercial Noncommercial or NonCommercial (nc): Licensees may copy, distribute, display, and perform the work and make derivative works based on it only for noncommercial purposes.

* Non-derivative No Derivative Works or NoDerivs (nd): Licensees may copy, distribute, display and perform only verbatim copies of the work, not derivative works based on it.

* Share-alike ShareAlike (sa): Licensees may distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs the original work. (See also copyleft.)

 

Combinations

 

Mixing and matching these conditions produces sixteen possible combinations, of which eleven are valid Creative Commons licenses and five are not. Of the five invalid combinations, four include both the "nd" and "sa" clauses, which are mutually exclusive; and one includes none of the clauses. Of the eleven valid licenses, the five that lack the "by" clause have been phased out because 98% of licensors requested Attribution, though they do remain available for reference on the website. This leaves six regularly used licenses:

 

1. Attribution alone (by)

2. Attribution + Noncommercial (by-nc)

3. Attribution + NoDerivs (by-nd)

4. Attribution + ShareAlike (by-sa)

5. Attribution + Noncommercial + NoDerivs (by-nc-nd)

6. Attribution + Noncommercial + ShareAlike (by-nc-sa)

 

For example, the Creative Commons Attribution (BY) license allows one to share and remix (create derivative works), even for commercial use, so long as attribution is given.

 

Works protected

 

Work licensed under a Creative Commons License is protected by copyright applicable law. This allows Creative Commons licenses to be applied to all work protected by copyright law, including: books, plays, movies, music, articles, photographs, blogs, and websites.

 

However, the license may not modify the rights allowed by fair use or fair dealing or exert restrictions which violate copyright exceptions. Furthermore, Creative Commons Licenses are non-exclusive and non-revocable.[6] Any work or copies of the work obtained under a Creative Commons license may continue to be used under that license.

 

In the case of works protected by multiple Creative Common Licenses, the user may choose either.

 

This is in comparison to what copyright means:

 

Copyright

 

Copyright gives the author of an original work exclusive right for a certain time period in relation to that work, including its publication, distribution and adaptation, after which time the work is said to enter the public domain. Copyright applies to any expressible form of an idea or information that is substantive and discrete and fixed in a medium. Some jurisdictions also recognize "moral rights" of the creator of a work, such as the right to be credited for the work. Copyright is described under the umbrella term intellectual property along with patents and trademarks.

 

An example of the intent of copyright, as expressed in the United States Constitution, is "To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries".

 

Copyright has been internationally standardized, lasting between fifty to a hundred years from the author's death, or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorship. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establishing copyright, but most recognize copyright in any completed work, without formal registration. Generally, copyright is enforced as a civil matter, though some jurisdictions do apply criminal sanctions.

 

Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works

 

The 1886 Berne Convention first established recognition of copyrights among sovereign nations, rather than merely bilaterally. Under the Berne Convention, copyrights for creative works do not have to be asserted or declared, as they are automatically in force at creation. In these countries, there is no requirement for an author to "register" or "apply for" a copyright, or to mark his or her works with a copyright symbol or other legend. As soon as a work is "fixed", that is, written or recorded on some physical medium, its author is automatically entitled to all copyrights in the work, and to any derivative works unless and until the author explicitly disclaims them, or until the copyright expires. The Berne Convention also resulted in foreign authors being treated equivalently to domestic authors, in any country signed onto the Convention. The UK signed the Berne Convention in 1887 but did not implement large parts of it until 100 years later with the passage of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act of 1988. The USA did not sign the Berne Convention until 1989.

 

The Berne Convention requires its signatories to recognize the copyright of works of authors from other signatory countries (known as members of the Berne Union) in the same way it recognises the copyright of its own nationals. For example, French copyright law applies to anything published or performed in France, regardless of where it was originally created.

 

In addition to establishing a system of equal treatment that internationalised copyright amongst signatories, the agreement also required member states to provide strong minimum standards for copyright law.

 

Copyright under the Berne Convention must be automatic; it is prohibited to require formal registration (note however that when the United States joined the Convention in 1988, they continued to make statutory damages and attorney's fees only available for registered works).

 

The Berne Convention states that all works except photographic and cinematographic shall be copyrighted for at least 50 years after the author's death, but parties are free to provide longer terms, as the European Union did with the 1993 Directive on harmonising the term of copyright protection. For photography, the Berne Convention sets a minimum term of 25 years from the year the photograph was created, and for cinematography the minimum is 50 years after first showing, or 50 years after creation if it hasn't been shown within 50 years after the creation. Countries under the older revisions of the treaty may choose to provide their own protection terms, and certain types of works (such as phonorecords and motion pictures) may be provided shorter terms.

 

Although the Berne Convention states that the copyright law of the country where copyright is claimed shall be applied, article 7.8 states that "unless the legislation of that country otherwise provides, the term shall not exceed the term fixed in the country of origin of the work", i.e. an author is normally not entitled a longer copyright abroad than at home, even if the laws abroad give a longer term. This is commonly known as "the rule of the shorter term". Not all countries have accepted this rule.

 

Exclusive rights

 

Several exclusive rights typically attach to the holder of a copyright:

 

* to produce copies or reproductions of the work and to sell those copies (mechanical rights; including, sometimes, electronic copies: distribution rights)

* to import or export the work

* to create derivative works (works that adapt the original work)

* to perform or display the work publicly (performance rights)

* to sell or assign these rights to others

* to transmit or display by radio or video (broadcasting rights)

 

The phrase “exclusive right,” in this context, means that only the copyright holder has a legal power to secure relief from a court against certain, statutorily defined uses by others without the copyright holder's authorization. The copyright holder is free to exercise those rights, unless doing so would violate rights of others. Copyright is sometimes called a “negative right” or "exclusionary right," as it serves to prohibit or exclude other people (e.g., readers, viewers, or listeners, and primarily publishers and would-be publishers) from doing something they would otherwise be able to do, rather than permitting people (e.g., authors) to do something they would otherwise be unable to do. In this way it is similar to the unregistered design right in English law and European law. The rights of the copyright holder also permit him/her to not use or exploit their copyright, for some or all of the term.

 

Duration

 

Copyright subsists for a variety of lengths in different jurisdictions. The length of the term can depend on several factors, including the type of work (e.g. musical composition, novel), whether the work has been published or not, and whether the work was created by an individual or a corporation. In most of the world, the default length of copyright is the life of the author plus either 50 or 70 years.

 

This might clear up some of the questions. I'm not sure, however since those of us have stated previously exactly what liberties can be taken with out art, we are covered by the Berne Convention with our copyrights.

 

Edited by RayneKitty

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Read most of that before my brain fried.

 

All I know is that I do NOT want my art to be modified, nor any avatars made for this site. If they wish to modify them, they may ask permission directly from me, stating what modifications they wish to make, and where the modified image will be used. I am fine with TJ modifying my art(Or at least, that for the avatars and sprite images) in any manner for use for DC, as those images I made for DC, and thus share the rights to them with DC and it's owner, TJ.

 

For all others, I request that you ask for permission prior to modifying my art, or using it elsewhere besides DC. (DC Sprites in progress can be edited/modified as long as permission has been granted in the thread with applies to the individual in question, whether it is a general granting of permission or to specific people.)

 

Of course, I haven't even made any avatars for DC yet, but I plan on it, so they may come into existence.

 

I hope that clarifies my wishes in concern to my art.

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Using them is perfectly fine. That's what they're made for. ^^

 

Okay, I scanned the image in, and cleaned it up some. I just had some issues figuring out how to make it into a little 100x100 avvie. xd.png Okay, I can try making a small image with the entire dragon on it, or a piece of the dragon(which would be the head, pretty much, with some of the neck/body etc.) But I couldn't decide what.

 

So, I figured I'd post it up here, and let someone else figure out the best way to crop it and shrink it. Feel free to add more color to it as well, since I only had greyscale shading markers with me at the time I drew this(during exams... xd.png) so it's got no color for the most part.

 

DO NOTE: This is ONLY for Project Default. Anybody else touches my art for any other reason, and I will tear you to pieces.

 

On another note as well, I am going to try spriting my image, to see how that works out for an avvie as well. So even if nobody else figured out anything with the main drawing, I'm going to make a sprite of it, and hopefully that'll look good. ^^ Feel free to reccomend color schemes for the sprite, since I've got no clue other than stick with the current white and grey/brown... >>;;

 

IMAGE HERE - DO NOT STEAL

 

So, yeah. Knock yourselves out! As long as it's for Project Default, you can do whatever to it.

Edited by Sif

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user posted image

 

In progress. Open to coloring, editing, etc. Heck, if I disappear and seem to forget about this thread, feel free to take it and finish. Because I probably did forget. >>;;

 

What do you all think so far?

 

Edit{/b]: Colored and shaded the dragon, now just have to finish the background. Still haven't gotten any word back on whether people even like the idea or not... but I'l finish it nonetheless. ^^ (Do note, just because the rock lines are green doesn't mean the rock is going to be green-- the rock will be tan/brown. ^^wink.gif

 

user posted image

Edited by Sif

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