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I'm currently feeling yellow with slight fear. How do I talk to children? How can I make learning easy and fun at the same time? (i.e. I might be teaching Chinese to Grade 3-4; ages 7-8 years old)

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I delegate the talking-to-small-things to other people.

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I'm currently feeling yellow with slight fear. How do I talk to children? How can I make learning easy and fun at the same time? (i.e. I might be teaching Chinese to Grade 3-4; ages 7-8 years old)

1. do NOT be afraid. Children aren't stupid, they notice when you're afraid and won't take you seriously at all.

 

2. be yourself. Children aren't stupid, they notice when you're not authentic. You don't have to be perfect at all, they don't care, but you need to be real.

 

3. children aren't stupid. They understand a lot more instinctively than most adults suspect. So just treat them normal, speak to them normal, act normal.

 

4. they're children, sometimes you will be surprised by what they DON'T know. Don't panic, they're used to that, they just want some help.

 

5. they trust you. They trust so easily and it can be overwhelming. Again, you don't need to be perfect here, just take the responsibility seriously.

 

6. don't panic when they are super shy. They will warm up over time.

 

7. ask for help when you need it.

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6. don't panic when they are super shy. They will warm up over time.

Thank you for your pointers. I am highlighting this because this is my main concern. The others aside from number 1 (which is still a bit problematic, but it will come) come so easily.

 

I fear this: What if they never warmed up at all? And they had grown attached to the teacher that I am replacing? The former teacher is so nice, but she had to leave for a reason. I remember as a child, I dislike change, and I can relate that to others. Maybe the students will feel the same; they will not like the change.

Edited by georgexu94

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I fear this: What if they never warmed up at all? And they had grown attached to the teacher that I am replacing? The former teacher is so nice, but she had to leave for a reason. I remember as a child, I dislike change, and I can relate that to others. Maybe the students will feel the same; they will not like the change.

No, if they really liked the other teacher they won't be thrilled, true. But you can acknowledge that and tell them you're going to try and still make it a fun time.

 

A good way to start out (prepare to be shocked, I know) are games. How much do they know already? Good is if they have to use the target language but only have to talk to other kids, it's less scary.

 

What works as well are little competitions. Which group can finish the task first etc.

 

Getting them out of their seats and moving around for a task also makes it less stressful for them and then you can mingle and chat with them.

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No, if they really liked the other teacher they won't be thrilled, true. But you can acknowledge that and tell them you're going to try and still make it a fun time.

 

A good way to start out (prepare to be shocked, I know) are games. How much do they know already? Good is if they have to use the target language but only have to talk to other kids, it's less scary.

 

What works as well are little competitions. Which group can finish the task first etc.

 

Getting them out of their seats and moving around for a task also makes it less stressful for them and then you can mingle and chat with them.

Thank you ever so much for the advice! I suppose my fears don't much have a basis.

 

user posted image

Penguin hugs!

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I need help. I work at Wal-Mart and they had an upgrade to the registers where I have to get my hands scanned. The thing is, I'm not comfortable with scanning my hands in ANY way, not even my simply pinky. Should I look for another job?

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I need help. I work at Wal-Mart and they had an upgrade to the registers where I have to get my hands scanned. The thing is, I'm not comfortable with scanning my hands in ANY way, not even my simply pinky. Should I look for another job?

There's an upgrade that will mean your hands getting scanned? o.o Granted, I've never worked in retail, but I'm curious how this works.

 

Ultimately, that decision is up to you. Things you should consider and weigh to make your decision:

- Why are you not comfortable having your hands scanned?

- Will you be able to continue good work and get a good night's rest if you get your hands scanned?

- How much do you need the money?

- How long can you go without a job before you run out of money?

- How many job opportunities are within reasonable travel distance from where you life?

- What are the chances you'll have to turn down other jobs for having similar technology?

 

Nobody can make this decision for you, though. You know you best and you know your situation best. Use your best judgement, and if you struggle - well, I usually go with my gut. ^^

 

I will advise that if you are debating leaving, you should go ahead and start looking and applying elsewhere. You can always turn down any interviews (or go to them for experience) or job offers you get if it turns out you decide to stay, but if you decide to leave, an earlier start on looking for jobs never hurts.

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Any students/former students here have experience with undergraduate research? :L I could use some advice.

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Any students/former students here have experience with undergraduate research? :L I could use some advice.

Yuppers.

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There's an upgrade that will mean your hands getting scanned? o.o Granted, I've never worked in retail, but I'm curious how this works.

 

Ultimately, that decision is up to you. Things you should consider and weigh to make your decision:

- Why are you not comfortable having your hands scanned?

- Will you be able to continue good work and get a good night's rest if you get your hands scanned?

- How much do you need the money?

- How long can you go without a job before you run out of money?

- How many job opportunities are within reasonable travel distance from where you life?

- What are the chances you'll have to turn down other jobs for having similar technology?

 

Nobody can make this decision for you, though. You know you best and you know your situation best. Use your best judgement, and if you struggle - well, I usually go with my gut. ^^

 

I will advise that if you are debating leaving, you should go ahead and start looking and applying elsewhere. You can always turn down any interviews (or go to them for experience) or job offers you get if it turns out you decide to stay, but if you decide to leave, an earlier start on looking for jobs never hurts.

Well, to actually open a register, you need to scan a hand to get the money from a machine. But what terrifies me is that I'll still be working there when they require us to have a chip implanted. While others may be gung ho about it, I'd quit on the spot and walk out the doors after getting my stuff from my locker. The main reason is I'm a Christian and that's a huge no-no to me.

 

The reason why I wasn't happy about my hands getting scanned is because of the reason I listed up above. I talked to some of my friends and they listened and gave their advice (one of them also being Christian and he was asking questions about it being a scan or an implant, said it's not to bad, but they did say my comfort level mattered and quit on the spot if they start the chip implant.

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Well, to actually open a register, you need to scan a hand to get the money from a machine. But what terrifies me is that I'll still be working there when they require us to have a chip implanted. While others may be gung ho about it, I'd quit on the spot and walk out the doors after getting my stuff from my locker. The main reason is I'm a Christian and that's a huge no-no to me.

 

The reason why I wasn't happy about my hands getting scanned is because of the reason I listed up above. I talked to some of my friends and they listened and gave their advice (one of them also being Christian and he was asking questions about it being a scan or an implant, said it's not to bad, but they did say my comfort level mattered and quit on the spot if they start the chip implant.

Huh. That sounds... super weird. I've never heard of this; I gotta do some research. o_O

 

Those were questions for you to think about and weigh for yourself. ;3 It's your life; you have to be the one to make the decision.

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I need help. I work at Wal-Mart and they had an upgrade to the registers where I have to get my hands scanned. The thing is, I'm not comfortable with scanning my hands in ANY way, not even my simply pinky. Should I look for another job?

I would become a monk in Tibet before working at WalMart but... I'm quite puzzled about your post.

Forget WalMart... Are you aware that all US International visitors, including Visa Waiver visitors and permanent residents (Green card holders) have their fingerprints recorded and checked every time they enter the USA?

Are you aware that many smartphones nowadays work with biometrics and recognize your fingerprints instead of using a password? Are you aware that biometrics are quite more secure than passwords?

Do you mind explaining what is your issue?

 

Edited:

UHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH? Never, ever, heard about a chip implanted. Your fingerprints are enough. Frankly, that sounds like (very old type of) SciFi.

Edited by SullenCat

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I think the chip implant references the Revelations in the Bible. Something about 666 and tattoos.

 

I would not be really bothered by biometrics. They help identify your unique individual. So, they are more secure than passwords.

 

Nota bene: I get my fingerprint scanned as well whenever I log in to work. It is easier than the punch cards that we used in the old days.

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I think the chip implant references the Revelations in the Bible. Something about 666 and tattoos.

This is sort of going off topic, but yes. It is the number of the Beast. Fun little fact, It's Revelation and not Revelations. But I'm going to end this conversation here about it as it's a help thread and not a religious thread.

 

A chip implant is already happening in Australia, Sullen. But I am going to be looking for another job.

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This is sort of going off topic, but yes. It is the number of the Beast. Fun little fact, It's Revelation and not Revelations. But I'm going to end this conversation here about it as it's a help thread and not a religious thread.

 

A chip implant is already happening in Australia, Sullen. But I am going to be looking for another job.

Yes, chip implant...voluntarily. http://www.snopes.com/australia-becomes-fi...-microchipping/

 

Ultimately, the decision is up to you, and your level of comfort matters, but biometrics is not something with which I'd personally be very worried.

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This is sort of going off topic, but yes. It is the number of the Beast. Fun little fact, It's Revelation and not Revelations. But I'm going to end this conversation here about it as it's a help thread and not a religious thread.

 

A chip implant is already happening in Australia, Sullen. But I am going to be looking for another job.

Referencing my previous post: I must agree on looking for another job. How does becoming a Tibetan monk sound? biggrin.gif

 

Edited: I'm far from concerned about biometrics. Actually love using my fingerprints on my phone instead of typing passwords. Have no intention, for now, of getting a micro-chip even my dogs and cats carry those, seem unaffected and two of them would have ended badly without micro-chips.

Edited by SullenCat

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This is sort of going off topic, but yes. It is the number of the Beast. Fun little fact, It's Revelation and not Revelations. But I'm going to end this conversation here about it as it's a help thread and not a religious thread.

 

A chip implant is already happening in Australia, Sullen. But I am going to be looking for another job.

Sounds like a wise choice. I'm assuming Wal-Mart in Australia is doing the finger-scanning as a way to trace internal theft.

 

It seems strange as in my experience working retail registers, you'd get a login number with a password to access and operate it. So normally any internal theft i.e, when your till comes short, is traceable by the ID numbers of the cashiers who used it that day.

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Sounds like a wise choice. I'm assuming Wal-Mart in Australia is doing the finger-scanning as a way to trace internal theft.

 

It seems strange as in my experience working retail registers, you'd get a login number with a password to access and operate it. So normally any internal theft i.e, when your till comes short, is traceable by the ID numbers of the cashiers who used it that day.

I suggest checking the link provided by Infinis. There's no evidence, at all, of Australia micro-chipping people. Can you spell H-O-A-X?

Instead, I find extremely reasonable to use a fingerprint instead of typing an ID and a password. Think "time", when you really need to make a call to the police and emergency services!

Personally I'm extremely peeved (and complained loudly) when my phone carrier "updated" (actually DOWNGRADED) the Android system in my Note smartphone so, now, every time it restarts I must enter a password instead of swiping my finger. Some silly rep dared to tell me that the "update" was done for security reasons and could not find any reason, afterwards, why a password was safer than a fingerprint scan.

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I suggest checking the link provided by Infinis. There's no evidence, at all, of Australia micro-chipping people. Can you spell H-O-A-X?

I only mentioned the finger-scanning, not the chipping. In no way was I contesting what Infinis posted earlier.

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I only mentioned the finger-scanning, not the chipping. In no way was I contesting what Infinis posted earlier.

And I was, in no way, contesting your post.

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Yuppers.

Nice, nice. Ok so basically what I'm wondering is whether I'm getting in over my head...

 

The director of undergrad research at my school gave a presentation in one of my classes and she pretty much said "EVERYONE SHOULD DO RESEARCH. I don't care what your major is, your career path, etc., GO. DO IT." And then she talked about this program for freshmen who have never done research before. It consists of a freshman finding a project and working with a mentor/researcher for 2 semesters, and at the end, they get a nice monetary award. She really emphasized how it was for freshmen with NO experience, and she said "You start off knowing nothing, and you learn as you go." So I decided to do something impulsive and join a project, knowing full well that I know literally nothing compared to these professors and grad students.

 

I met with the professor and he was enthusiastic but I'm getting the feeling that maybe he doesn't realize just how little I know. I told him I'm an undergrad and I don't think he's ever had an undergrad help his research team before. I told him that I don't really know anything about anything. I told him "I'm here to help and to learn, so I'll do whatever you/your team want from an undergrad assistant." He seemed okay with that. But now he wants me to be in charge of my own project. Like, what? Do I just have a fundamental misunderstanding of what undergraduate research is?

 

The director of research, who introduced me to this whole idea, basically said that, in areas as complicated as the hard sciences, undergrads aren't expected to come up with their own questions to investigate. They help the graduate students who actually know what they're doing. This is what I thought I was getting myself into. But this guy is like "Ok, you don't know anything? Cool, cool, so let's have you be in charge of your own research project." blink.gif

 

Today I met with him & his graduate students again, and they want me to continue the work of a grad student who is leaving their team, so I don't have to come up with the project out of thin air, but I'm basically replacing a grad student? Even though I'm literally fresh out of high school and volunteering my time there to help?

 

Am I misinterpreting this situation? Should I expect that I'll be guided as I go along and be able to ask questions and find out where the heck to start and what to do? I don't want to burden these researchers, lol. They seem okay with me knowing nothing yet they have pretty big, unspecific expectations for me. Is there a huge misunderstanding happening? I figured the point of it was to be mentored/coached by a researcher, not to just be given the reins and told "alright here you go. Any questions?"

 

Obviously this is just doing WONDERS for my anxiety. rolleyes.gif

 

I guess my biggest question is 1) What does 'undergraduate research' entail because I've heard the term thrown around but apparently I don't know what it is? And then the advice I'm asking is 2) Am I making a big mistake? Because I reeeally want to do this but I feel like something's gotten lost in translation between me and the professor.

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Nice, nice. Ok so basically what I'm wondering is whether I'm getting in over my head...

 

The director of undergrad research at my school gave a presentation in one of my classes and she pretty much said "EVERYONE SHOULD DO RESEARCH. I don't care what your major is, your career path, etc., GO. DO IT." And then she talked about this program for freshmen who have never done research before. It consists of a freshman finding a project and working with a mentor/researcher for 2 semesters, and at the end, they get a nice monetary award. She really emphasized how it was for freshmen with NO experience, and she said "You start off knowing nothing, and you learn as you go." So I decided to do something impulsive and join a project, knowing full well that I know literally nothing compared to these professors and grad students.

 

I met with the professor and he was enthusiastic but I'm getting the feeling that maybe he doesn't realize just how little I know. I told him I'm an undergrad and I don't think he's ever had an undergrad help his research team before. I told him that I don't really know anything about anything. I told him "I'm here to help and to learn, so I'll do whatever you/your team want from an undergrad assistant." He seemed okay with that. But now he wants me to be in charge of my own project. Like, what? Do I just have a fundamental misunderstanding of what undergraduate research is?

 

The director of research, who introduced me to this whole idea, basically said that, in areas as complicated as the hard sciences, undergrads aren't expected to come up with their own questions to investigate. They help the graduate students who actually know what they're doing. This is what I thought I was getting myself into. But this guy is like "Ok, you don't know anything? Cool, cool, so let's have you be in charge of your own research project."  blink.gif

 

Today I met with him & his graduate students again, and they want me to continue the work of a grad student who is leaving their team, so I don't have to come up with the project out of thin air, but I'm basically replacing a grad student? Even though I'm literally fresh out of high school and volunteering my time there to help?

 

Am I misinterpreting this situation? Should I expect that I'll be guided as I go along and be able to ask questions and find out where the heck to start and what to do? I don't want to burden these researchers, lol. They seem okay with me knowing nothing yet they have pretty big, unspecific expectations for me. Is there a huge misunderstanding happening? I figured the point of it was to be mentored/coached by a researcher, not to just be given the reins and told "alright here you go. Any questions?"

 

Obviously this is just doing WONDERS for my anxiety.  rolleyes.gif

 

I guess my biggest question is 1) What does 'undergraduate research' entail because I've heard the term thrown around but apparently I don't know what it is? And then the advice I'm asking is 2) Am I making a big mistake? Because I reeeally want to do this but I feel like something's gotten lost in translation between me and the professor.

So it hugely depends on who you're working with and what they need. I had one professor who straight up just wanted me to read a bunch of papers and tell him what they were about (and for no pay...), which I was not going to do. My undergrad college kinda sucked for undergrads (all the professors just wanted to do research but didn't want to put the time into teaching undergrads so that we could become researchers ourselves...), so a lot of projects were similar to this. But a few people did get to work in labs, doing things like thin section identification for professors or things like cleaning up fossils and sorting through boxes of dirt to find the teeny tiny fossils.

 

But I've had two undergrad workers for my current MS project. Let me detail what their experience was like:

First, I'm a geologist. My project is a laboratory weathering experiment of rocks. I have a few pyrex columns set up in a closet in the lab. They are filled with crushed rock. Water is fed through them and then collected once it's gone all the way through the column. These leachate samples are collected once a week, then I run geochemical analyses on them to test their composition (how much Ca, Mg, SiO2, etc. is weathering out). I have run two separate experiments but have data from three. In my experiments, the flow rate is the same but the rocks differ.

 

Lab asst 1: Actually helped create the current setup for the experiment. His experiment had the same rocks but the flow rate differed. The purpose of this experiment was to determine which flow rate would be best for a rock weathering experiment: which one was easiest to manage, did we get different results with different flow rates, etc. So he and my/his advisor spent quite a lot of time just figuring out how to get the columns up and running and what the best way to monitor flow was. A huge part of his project consisted of him and our advisor playing around with different tubing sizes and monitoring the speed of flow. Once that was finished and the columns were actually put up, he was in charge of general maintenance of the experiment. This consisted of: collecting weekly samples, replacing reservoir water to keep flow running, replacing tubing if it clogged up (the sample was less, indicating flow was compromised), taking notes on the samples (weight, pH, and date taken), and watching for things like containment issues (our fast flow rate was so fast it was difficult to only take samples once a week since we didn't have a big enough sample collection bottle). Our advisor did most the data analysis for him, but he did learn how to make standards for the instruments. Once all of his data was collected, I was brought into the fold, so while he was in charge of organizing his data, I did most the math and data interpretation, and he followed what I did. He also had the opportunity to do a poster presentation at a local conference. He did the base poster setup, then I provided mineralogical point counts and thin section pictures for him, and another advisor created the graphs he wanted from the assistant's data. So, he got some experience in setting up a poster, then he presented it by himself. As well, he also got to come into the field with me a few times. I did all the note taking and decision making, but he helped drill rock samples for me (learing how to use a rock drill in the process) and got to learn about the field. He was also a general lab assistant, which basically just means cleaning beakers and such and running to the chem stock room for us whenever we need more Argon or sample vials.

tl;dr: most of his job was just lab management stuff that we can take care of but is time consuming, so we shove off on lab assistants. However, he did gain experience in data collection and management as well as presenting scientific data. By the end, he got to add quite a few instruments/skills to his resume. The advisors and I, the lone grad student on the team, did most of the data interpretation and graph building.

 

Lab asst 2: Our previous assistant decided to double major, so had to drop his job with us in order to keep up with his class workload. So asst 2 came in as my second experiment was finishing and we were starting the third experiment. He helped pack rock into the columns for the third experiment. Asst 1 stayed long enough to help train him in the management of the columns. So, his job was also mostly managing columns and collecting samples for me. Since we were well into my project by this time, he didn't get as much time to learn the instruments. The original plan was to teach him how to make standards and run the instruments, but he never had enough time to actually sit there and do this with me. So, his job was to fill the sample vials with samples for me, but I continued to make standards and run the instruments (a job passed to me from my advisor when I came on). He went into the field with me once to take detailed notes and GPS coordinates for a section of my field that corresponded with some geophysical work being done. My notes are currently helping to write a geological interpretation of the geophysical data there, but my lab asst's job was to take the GPS coordinates and help with rock collection. Something he's done that asst 1 didn't get to do is petrology, ie thin section work. I did initial mineralogy on thin sections as well as initial notes and observations. His job has been to: take detailed notes of mineralogy, grain boundary relationships, structures, and take pictures of interesting mineralogical relationships. He's taken two petrology classes and had numerous grad students help to answer his microscope questions and confirm what he's seeing available to him. Our advisor and he meet every now and then to go over his notes and help give a final confirmation of his identifications. He was also a general lab asst (ie cleaning beakers and stock room runs) - we've now hired a third person for this to replace him when he leaves, as he's been so busy with my petrology, he's had to give up these basic duties.

tl;dr most of his job was general management of columns and taking samples, but he's also gained a huge knowledge base in petrology that was far more challenging than his classes.

 

It's worth noting that both my assistant's were paid.

 

A lot of other grad students with undergrad workers give their workers the same type of responsibilities: cleaning things in lab, helping with sample collection, doing menial but important tasks like grinding rocks or using the rock saw to make billets for thin sections, etc. Sometimes, they might attend meetings with the research group (usually one or two professors and then a team of grad students), which usually include discussion of papers being read by the group or presentation and interpretation of data from a grad student's project.

 

So! What does this mean for you?

 

Creating your own project when you are just entering the field? Definitely over your head.

Continuing a grad student's project? Sounds like a cheap way for the professor to continue to get results without having to find a grad student to take over, imo.

 

Now. If this is something you really want to do or try, this could be a great opportunity for you. Chances are, you'll learn a lot. However, I do doubt you'll have the time the project will need in addition to your other classes. You are taking a full undergrad load of coursework. In most places, this means a minimum of twelve credits - twelve credits is the maximum for grad students specifically because it's really distracting to getting our research done otherwise.

 

Them putting this on you while knowing nothing isn't that surprising. It tends to be how research goes. Someone says they're interested in the job and those paying you to do it assume you can do it. You get training for instruments, but everyone just kind of assumes you can do whatever math, interpretation, etc. necessary otherwise. Which gives you a certain freedom but is also a lot of pressure! I think it's reasonable to do this to grad students, who have a degree or two under their belt, but not so reasonable for undergrads. We can always read papers to expand our knowledge, but the difference between grads and undergrads is the experience in making interpretational decisions and making decisions on if what they see is logical and reasonable (along with the backup knowledge from their field to inform this).

 

In an undergrad project, there is a lot of working with professors/grad students - although I don't think there's a whole lot of coaching or mentoring, tbh - but it's usually helping to fill in gaps and doing the tasks that need to be done but that grad students/professors don't want to waste time on because 1) they can train an undergrad to do it, and 2) it can get very repetitive and takes time away from actually looking at the data and writing papers.

 

So I don't think you're wrong in being a little letdown with this turn of events.

 

I would suggest talking to the director of research again and letting them know the situation. It can vary by school, so the director would have some good insight on your specific situation as well. Or perhaps they could talk to the professor and help come up with some more defined responsibilities for you. Or they might help match you with a different professor. Alternatively, you could ask to meet with the professor alone and bring up your concerns and what type of work you'd be doing (perhaps email a few grad students, ask if they have any undergrad helpers, and see what sort of tasks their undergrad workers do - it's hard for me to guess without knowing your major =p ). If you know what sort of stuff other undergrads do, then you could have some examples of what you expected to do for the professor. You could also gently remind the professor that you're not getting paid, and with your course load, you will not have time to do something as big as continue the work of the former student. You could also talk to his grad students about what their projects are and see if there is stuff they would like done (do they need data organized in a spreadsheet, do they need help with sample collection, etc. - stuff you could do to be involved in the project but that take up their research time), then propose that you help with these duties.

 

I do know undergrads who have defined their own projects, but that's usually for an undergrad research/thesis project when you're a junior/senior.

 

tl;dr There is no real specification for what an undergrad project may be. It could range from reading papers for a professor to helping do sample collection and equipment cleaning to doing your own project. I do think it is fair for you to turn down doing your own research if you're not ready for that yet, as it's not something I'd expect an undergrad to really get into until they're a junior. But I don't think that means you have to give up on working with this professor or doing undergrad research completely. ^^

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I guess my biggest question is 1) What does 'undergraduate research' entail because I've heard the term thrown around but apparently I don't know what it is? And then the advice I'm asking is 2) Am I making a big mistake? Because I reeeally want to do this but I feel like something's gotten lost in translation between me and the professor.

Depends on the type of research:

 

- I did a literature review, which was a study of all literature on a topic within certain guidelines, bringing all the evidence generated together in one article, and then producing a paper with the evidence surmised and a suggestion as to where this new area of research could progress to.

 

- I hope to get Lover involved in another project I'd like to head up which would make her the undergraduate. It'll be a study of how a therapeutic intervention affects the lives and psyche of a patient group. This'll involve generating a list of prompts/questions to ask at the focus group, sifting through the responses to generate themes, and where possible marry those themes with current evidence base.

 

- My ex did a lot of lab work which, had she taken a bit of time, could have generated a paper of her own. This was by studying a potential new drug by making subtle changes to the formula before exposing it to test cell samples and spectrograph (?) analysis.

 

And I would say it is worth it, but be prepared to put in a lot of time for very little tangible rewards. But if it puts your name on a paper, even if it's last on the list, then it looks darn good when it comes to getting a job.

 

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