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School/University/College

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Bleh, school. Maybe it'll be better in later grades, but right now I'm going into Grade 9 and all of my experience with school has been terrible. I like school when we get to do interesting things, or even just some new things, but that never seems to happen. My school is really tiny (it's a K-12 school with about three hundred students), and everything seems to happen very slowly. Math class is basically just waiting for half an hour while the teacher explains something that should have taken ten minutes (or even just repeating what he said last class), twenty minutes of punching numbers into a calculator, and then waiting for the bell to ring. Science is even worse (at least we only have it for half the year); does it really take a class to say that light moves faster in air than in water, without even saying why?

 

Some of the school rules are really confusing as well. We're not allowed to use iPods, phones, handheld game systems, etc. Okay, fine, they don't want us to be distracted in class. There's not really any learning going on anyway, but it makes sense. So... why aren't we allowed to use them when we've completely finished our work? If I could either stare at the clock and be terribly bored or play Pokemon 'til class was over, my Math teacher last year would still take my game away. Books are allowed for some reason, though. I don't understand how re-reading Harry Potter is any better than, you know, reading science or math articles online and actually learning something, or even reading a Harry Potter e-book.

 

Sorry about the rant. I probably shouldn't be complaining about school when it hasn't even started yet. Who knows, maybe this year will be better? ...That sounds a bit unlikely, but if it makes me feel better in the meantime I guess I'll go with it.

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Today after I rode my bus over to my sister's high school so that the high school kids could be taken home I got to stay for my sister's Stem club, or whatever its called meeting, because my sister had the meeting today and they did some kind of science experiment. Basically the people who were showing everything off had some bottle rockets, an air pump, and some machine where you put the bottle on upside down with the water in it. And then they pump air with the air pump that would be hooked up to the machine and when there is enough air pressure it flys off of the stand its on. They let other high schoolers that were in the club try it after they did it a few times and then after that they let me do it!

 

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for the first time in a while, the food at my school was really yummy omg

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Thats weird, but good I guess. I havent bought my lunch at school since first grade because I didnt like it the times I bought my lunch in first grade.

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I would want to ask the USA people here: how is the school term there?

 

Is it the same as this below?

Regular Semester: 18 weeks

1st Semester: August to December

2nd Semester: January to May

Intersession: 6 weeks, June to July

 

Also, I want also the answer from Australians. tongue.gif Just curious.

 

We're having some changes here. That's why I'm synchronising.

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Also, I want also the answer from Australians. tongue.gif Just curious.

I'm an Australian, but I haven't been to school in eight years so my infomation might be a bit off.

 

In Australia, schooling is separated into four terms.

 

While the start and end dates vary from state to state, the following is accurate for Queensland and maybe New South Wales.

 

Term one: end of January through to mid-April.

Term two: end of April through to end of June.

Term three: mid-July through to mid-September.

Term four: early October through to mid-December.

 

Term one and two make up semester one, term three and four make up semester two.

 

Also grades here are called years, although you'll get the occasional person that calls them grades. A "Year One" student is typically 6 years of age while a "Year Twelve" student is typically 17 years of age. The compulsory schooling system is broken into two sections, Primary and Secondary (also called High School). Primary School ranges from Year One through to Year Seven, whilst Secondary or High School ranges from Year Eight to Year Twelve.

 

For Tertiary education, there's University and TAFE (Technical and Further Education). A TAFE institute may also refer to themselves as a College. I could go on about the differences, but it's 3am and my brain isn't making any sense of it. In essence: University = Diploma through to Doctoral Degree, TAFE = Certificate I (one) through to Bachelor Degree.

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@VampiricOmen: Thanks for sharing the info. By the way, summer is December to February there, right? Since well, if I am not mistaken, it's in the Southern hemisphere.

 

(What I am wondering though is that how would our school claim to be going global just because they are changing the school terms. Perhaps it's because of the many exchange students were having problems with the start of school term and they are all from the northern hemisphere, i.e. Taiwan, European countries. sad.gif However, I still prefer the old curriculum with April-May summer break. It brings out the uniqueness.)

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I'm an Australian, but I haven't been to school in eight years so my infomation might be a bit off.

 

In Australia, schooling is separated into four terms.

 

While the start and end dates vary from state to state, the following is accurate for Queensland and maybe New South Wales.

 

Term one: end of January through to mid-April.

Term two: end of April through to end of June.

Term three: mid-July through to mid-September.

Term four: early October through to mid-December.

 

Term one and two make up semester one, term three and four make up semester two.

 

Also grades here are called years, although you'll get the occasional person that calls them grades. A "Year One" student is typically 6 years of age while a "Year Twelve" student is typically 17 years of age. The compulsory schooling system is broken into two sections, Primary and Secondary (also called High School). Primary School ranges from Year One through to Year Seven, whilst Secondary or High School ranges from Year Eight to Year Twelve.

 

For Tertiary education, there's University and TAFE (Technical and Further Education). A TAFE institute may also refer to themselves as a College. I could go on about the differences, but it's 3am and my brain isn't making any sense of it. In essence: University = Diploma through to Doctoral Degree, TAFE = Certificate I (one) through to Bachelor Degree.

This is pretty much how our schools in Africa work as well.

 

The only thing that is a bit different we called the year we were in Standard 1 to where others would call it Grade 3. This however this is changing now to Grade for all schools in South Africa.

 

I believe most of the Southern Hemisphere is like this.

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biggrin.gif I'm having a great time in philosophy class. Even though most times I get low scores. I should really practice writing better essays.

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@VampiricOmen: Thanks for sharing the info. By the way, summer is December to February there, right? Since well, if I am not mistaken, it's in the Southern hemisphere.

That's correct!

 

I much prefer the term system in my own country too, it would be weird to have different holiday breaks than what I grew up with.

 

Philosophy sounds like an interesting course of study, except the essays, those sound painful. laugh.gif

 

This is pretty much how our schools in Africa work as well.

 

The only thing that is a bit different we called the year we were in Standard 1 to where others would call it Grade 3. This however this is changing now to Grade for all schools in South Africa.

 

I believe most of the Southern Hemisphere is like this.

That's actually pretty awesome Spirit, I knew a little bit about the school system in the United States, but haven't learned about the systems in other countries/continents. How did the Standard system work? Did Standard 2 for example, indicate an equivalent of Grade 4?

 

---

 

I'll be on my fifth week of an Interactive Digital Media course tomorrow, the first four weeks was a walk in the park in comparison to the work set out for the next month or so. I get to work on a project though, which is pretty cool. I have to design a logo for a company (real or fake), and go through the design steps from a creative brief right through to the presentation of the finished logo. Having previous experience with Photoshop is proving to be a hindrance in working with Illustrator, but I like being able to scale my work to any size without a loss of quality.

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ive heard that certain schools in the us are running on a schedule where they have three blocks and students have to go to school during two of the blocks so basically

 

Jan-May

May-Sep

Sep-Jan

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I don't exactly know the ages of little ones here in the US, but I do know that kids enter middle school around 12 and leave around 14. Therefore, high school also starts around age 14 and ends around age 18. If you're really curious, here is a copy of my school's calender.

 

Depending on how much you want to try in life, high school can be completely grueling or just average. I want to be a veterinarian, so 11th grade is probably my toughest year so far. I'm taking food/nutrition, AP chemistry, AP english, and AP statistics this semester.

 

AP classes are basically college level classes given to us for free in half the time college students use to take it. At the end of the course, we take the AP exam (which cost about $80 per class at my school) and are scored on a scale of 1 - 5. 3+ typically gets you college credit and allows you to bypass a class in college. It's pretty nice, because [iF we pass the exam] we have only paid a fraction of the cost it would have took 1 - 2 years down the road.

 

But, AP classes are no joke. The workload is typically massive when you pile it all together. At my school, you have to take at least 2 AP classes to go the AP route. We're normally on a block schedule, which is four one hour and twenty minute long classes for 1 semester [18 weeks] and a different set for the other half of the year. Though, AP classes makes things complicated. We go to AP class A on mondays and wednesdays, then we go to AP class B on tuesdays and thursdays, then split a block on fridays so we can see all AP classes. And they last all year long. So basically: AP classes go every other day for an entire year so they can give us more homework and still call it a one-semester-long class.

 

I don't have time to breathe. I wake up at 6:00 AM every morning and leave at 7:50. School starts at 8:30 and our student parking section is hell. I get to cook yummy food every morning if I'm not too busy with homework. Food class is basically a study hall where a nice old lady teaches us how to make cookies, biscuits, and other treats. I spend my actual study hall that I go to every other day doing homework. School ends at 3:30 and I get home around 4:00 even though it's a 12 minute drive and I go the back roads to avoid traffic. Why? The student section parking lot. There's not enough parking spots and our entire student body campus of about 4,000 people grades 7 - 12 is on a two-lane road. Last year I heard we had 32 accidents in one semester. I've literally watched people just back straight into each other without even noticing. On tuesdays, I have 45 minute mandatory after school sessions for Chemistry. On Mondays and Thursdays, I stay over an hour after school for drama club practices. I pretty much have to start on homework around 6:00 if I want to go to sleep around 9:45 and get a liveable 8 hours of sleep. So, in the end, I get about an hour of freetime. Goodie. I hope it really does get better after high school..

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Not to be a downer, but not really. What you're describing sounds like a standard college class workload. Sometimes AP can be worse than college classes, but besides going for a whole year every-other-day, the rest sounds pretty par for the course.

 

You basically need to chose two out of leisure, sleep, and work. You sacrifice the third.

 

I don't do the sleeping one. I keep it to about four hours of sleep on the nights I have things to do the next day, and sleep in if I can.

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That's actually pretty awesome Spirit, I knew a little bit about the school system in the United States, but haven't learned about the systems in other countries/continents. How did the Standard system work? Did Standard 2 for example, indicate an equivalent of Grade 4?

Yeah something like that... If I remember correctly.

 

When I first went to primary school (age 7) we started with Grade 1 and then the following year Grade 2. Those were basically considered as big school kindergarten due to we were still learning to read and write.

Then at the age of 9 you basically started with Standard 1 (Grade 3 now). This was considered as the first step of going to a big school. And then from Standard 1 (Grade 3) you go through the years till Standard 10 (Grade 12 or as we call it Matric).

They changed it when I was in Standard 4 (I think) to the grade system and banned physical punishment as well.

 

Sadly our country isn't really bright when it comes to the schooling system. Thinking that changing standard to grade would be something brilliant. Instead they should have focused more on supplying books to students and getting more teachers.

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Uhm yeah, I'm in uni and that sounds like a day to day basis for me. Though I never heard of this AP thing (I'm from Belgium), we work on a different system in high school.

I did science-maths in high school, a very theoretical choice, and it was honestly a breeze compared to uni. If you want to study, you just have to be prepared to sacrifice most of your free time.

I do get my 7 hours (sometimes 8) sleep a day still. Don't know how it'll be this year, but probably the same still. Going to sleep at 9.30pm is standard for me, I gotta wake up early too.

Though I don't get why you complain about taking 30 mins to get home? For me, it takes at least an hour to get home, if I'm in bad luck 2 hours. So that's an average of 3 hours a day I spend on a bus during school hours. It may suck, but you just have to suck it up and think of what your end goal is.

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I do have a question, what is AP?

 

First thing that entered my mind was Araling Panlipunan but then, no, since that's Filipino.

 

AP (Araling Panlunan)= Social Studies

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I do have a question, what is AP?

 

First thing that entered my mind was Araling Panlipunan but then, no, since that's Filipino.

 

AP (Araling Panlunan)= Social Studies

advanced placement, basically pre college classes that give you college credit

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Blarg. I'm gonna go ahead and have a bit of a vent seeing as school/uni is my main source of stress right now. So the situation is:

 

I had a place at a vet school, and my grades were good enough to take the place. Problem is that I had an epiphany* (right before one of my vet school interviews as it happens) that I have a passion for scientific research way more than clinical practice. Of course, clinicians often go into research; but my interests aren't that easy to get into from a clinical background, and I didn't like the sound of signing up for three years of clinical training on top of my degree when I'd already decided I wasn't going to use it. So eventually I decided to turn down the place and take a gap year before applying for molecular biology.

 

I'm now faced with writing a personal statement for my application all over again, and I'd forgotten how stressful the process was last year. I have to read up on stuff for interviews. Some of that is deeply enjoyable (What? My chores consist of reading books on my passion? How terrible!) but some of the topics I'm meant to know about at interview are not so interesting and/or just plain hard.

 

All of which leaves me wondering if it wouldn't just have been easier to take the place at vet school and see what happened. Of course, rational me knows that doing a vet degree I didn't want to do would not be easier than this, but I'm totally at my wits' end with trying to cram every aspect of my school and extra-curricular carrer into 4000 characters, along with copious passionate dialog about exactly the right scientific issues that aren't too popular but also must demonstrate interest in specified areas and be focused and also broad-based. Oh, and because I'm taking a gap year, I also have to write down what I'm planning to do and how that's relevant to the degree I'm applying for.

 

*Ok, not exactly an epiphany, more like a sudden realisation that obsessing over the vet school application had drowned out a bunch of thoughts going this isn't actually what you want to do with your life... and if only I'd paid attention earlier I could have skipped that whole process and I'd probably be starting a molecular biology degree soon instead of flailing about in a panic like I am doing.

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Bah, adjusting to university workload is difficult. Just all the review we have to do, I feel like my brain's a saturated sponge. Any tips on how to stage it so I'm not studying/working in vain?

 

Especially chemistry. It's a flipped classroom which I was excited for but I'm finding it really difficult to manage because it takes me about two hours per module to go through.

Edited by High Lord November

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Alfabravo, I originally wanted to go into vet med, too. I ended up falling in love with genetics, though, so I'm working on my PhD in entomology (genomics and evolution specialization).

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financially college is just brutal they charge us out of district despite us being technically in district because there are two campuses two hours apart

so for us to be counted in district we would have to go to the other college or live two hours away from the other campus

it makes no sense

 

but i am in college have been since i was 15 dual credit was an option for me

im almost done though

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Ive been messing around with some computer stuff Ive learned today at school.

 

Anyone who hass a windows 7 computer push the windows key and the tab key at the same time and see what happens! I promise it s nothng bad!

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I do plan on going to college, but I'm in a very tight spot right now. I've only got this year and next year of high school left. The problem is finances and even so what am I going to college for.

In today's world the only way to get a decent paying job is by going to college but even so most people who go to college don't even get a job in what they studied for.

I don't want just some high paying job, I want something I love as well and something that will help me support my future family (if I ever get one).

I feel as if everything is coming at me at once and I'm just stuck like a deer in the headlights.

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I'm literally sick of uni already. xd.png

(yes literally: sore throat&swollen glands, nausea, stomachache, droopy nose, general icky feeling)

 

I started monday with my masters. These courses are partially in Maastricht, which adds 1.5hours to my 2.5hours travelling a day. Workload sounds easybut is bloody tiring. Reading articles, completely comprehending them and being able to analyze and critique it. Plus the lectures are pretty tough matter. The master is also given completely in english, which is a huge adaptation from dutch classes.

 

I'm just glad the professor said these first 2 courses (12 weeks) are the hardest in the entire masters. *slowly dies*

Edited by Sany

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