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Attention Deficit Disorder

Do you have clinically diagnosed Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)?  

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it's no longer referred to as ADD. it's now referred to as ADHD innatentive type. i've got combined type ADHD

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it's no longer referred to as ADD. it's now referred to as ADHD innatentive type.

Speaking of which, Sola, how do you set a diagnose for

1) someone of the inattentive type, without the hyperactive component?

2) an adult?

Edited by lightbird

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Yes, I know the criteria, but it says nothing about how specifically adults are diagnosed.

 

Also, in the case of inattentive type, parents, who don't watch their child closely, may not notice symptoms, and the affected person themselves might not think that there's something wrong with them until life develops in a way that reveals that.

 

You see, I display all the symptoms of the inattentive component, looking back at it, I always have, but because it only started seriously affecting my life in the past few years (with the prospect of University studies and hopefully holding a stable job after I graduate), I only relatively recently started to do my own research on this - for the most part, after I understood that I am incapable of working on my Bachelor thesis without making mistakes, no matter how well I knew the procedures, no matter how many reminder notes I would write, no matter how many times my mentor would bash me about why the heck can't I be more disciplined. I also had problems with managing bigger homework tasks when I was in school, but because I was a moderately bright kid, I could on most occasions somehow shrug those off without seriously impairing my further education opportunities, something I don't feel proud about. I'm beyond of the age where I might think that having a disorder is cool or gives advantages.

Edited by lightbird

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I have been tested for ADD and I do have this wonderful "gift". That's right I don't view it as something bad, because I can run around with little kid all day long and still go on, plus if I like something, my mind can run with it and finish a task before someone else. Now like most, if I am sat in a boring lecture (im in college now) then I do tend to drift off into space, while having a hard time bringing myself back to the topic at hand.

 

I found that if you doodle something small on the sides of your paper while in said classes that you can focus a little better, or it you really have to pay attention (you need a grade, or you just want to focus better) Sit closer to the front, that way you have less to grab your attention then you would if you sat in the back.

 

Also I find that if I eat a little something before class, I focus a little better, so long as it is not something sweet, no that makes the "sitting still" thing just a bit harder then it should be (but we all know this).

 

I know adults who had ADD, and the ADHD, one of whom is my physiology professor. He agrees that this "disorder" is anything but. Not only do you have more energy then most, but you can think about something that engrosses you better then someone else. The only time this is a problem is in the boring classroom setting. If teachers made lessons more interactive and less talking on their point, less kids with ADD and ADHD would be called out and labeled ADD and ADHD (even though they are, but labels these day and ages are horrible).

 

I took medication for all of a week, it did not work for me, but like I said I found my way of coping with my overactive brain.

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=B Glad I'm not the odd one out with the voices thing. None of my classmates apparently do that but I do know one kid who says he sees numbers in red. Weird little quirks are always fun.

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=B Glad I'm not the odd one out with the voices thing. None of my classmates apparently do that but I do know one kid who says he sees numbers in red. Weird little quirks are always fun.

Oh, you've got a synethese (or however you spell it, I still can't remember) in your class? Neat.

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I'm starting to suspect I have that thing. I'm considering going to a doctor to get tested.

Unless something really manages to catch my attention, I tend to drift off too much.

I never thought it being a problem, but it is starting to affect my proffesional life.

 

I think I need help...

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I zone out a lot, but I suspect this is due to lack of energy, not excess. It also started recently, sooo I don't think I have ADD.

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Mt boyfriend has AADD, and it's very hard to deal with. I'm just glad I'm so patient or I would have not been able to handle it. He's a great guy, but he zones out all the time, and it's very hard to get him to focus on anything unless he's interested in it, even important tasks that have set time-lines (like work, appointments, getting to the restaurant before it closes , etc.) His iphone is the thing he hyper-fixates on. If he didn't have that in his hands 24/7 he'd probably chew his nails off from fidgety nibbling. xd.png I always feel like he's ignoring me, because he never remembers anything I tell him unless I text it to him (since he reads it on his phone) and it's obvious to me when he's spacing out while I'm talking. But I know he's not doing it on purpose or to be mean, it's something he can't help.

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Speaking of which, Sola, how do you set a diagnose for

1) someone of the inattentive type, without the hyperactive component?

2) an adult?

Well over here in the UK it is quite hard to get an adult dx of ADHD. There are only a few places that can give one. It is done by an adult psychiatrist with experience in ADHD and there aren't many adult ADHD clinics. Most kids who age out of child and adolescent mental health end up seeing a 'general' psych in adult services. If they are lucky they will transfer to an adult ADHD clinic.

 

As for the process, several sessions are spent with the adult psych. Like with Aspergers, you need someone with you who could give a reliable description of you as a child. You would probably also see a psychologist. The process isn't as intense as the one for a child, but for a child you have to rule out various other factors which could affect behaviour like developmental disorders, hearing loss, sight problems etc. These generally would have already been picked up upon in an adult so you don't have to see such a wide range of specialists. There is also a Rating Scale similar to the one used in children.

 

For the inattentive type, that is actually taken care of in the Rating Scales. Most adults with ADHD lose the H part as they get through adolescence. Sometimes there is some residual hyperactivity which can take the form of pacing, twitching, foot tapping etc. But the extreme hyperactivity which you see in children is not the norm in adult ADHD. Sadly my son is one of the small percentage of adults (he is 16 now) who has kept the hyperactivity. Usually by the age of around 14 it has started to wane. His is as strong as ever.

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I was diagnosed early on in my development. Psychiatric examinations are all I remember because the man who did them was bald and had a snake skin in his office.

 

But, I've heard a lot about Ritilan being a poor drug. I, personally, take Concerta. Superbly high dosage though. I think it's the highest they make, but I don't know much about drugs. It really makes a difference for me though, so it's good.

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I was diagnosed early on in my development. Psychiatric examinations are all I remember because the man who did them was bald and had a snake skin in his office.

 

But, I've heard a lot about Ritilan being a poor drug. I, personally, take Concerta. Superbly high dosage though. I think it's the highest they make, but I don't know much about drugs. It really makes a difference for me though, so it's good.

Ritalin is Methylphenidate. Concerta is just another brand of it, Concerta XR is the slow release version.

 

What dosage are you on?

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I've never been tested but I most likely don't have it.

A couple of my friends do and they are SUPER high-energy. tongue.gif

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I think it's 54. I've just heard bad stuff about Ritilan, I've never done research on the medicines for ADD. Oh, and I'm absolutely high energy, just not willing to run about.

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I think it's 54. I've just heard bad stuff about Ritilan, I've never done research on the medicines for ADD. Oh, and I'm absolutely high energy, just not willing to run about.

54mg is the highest dose pill available of Concerta XR (which I presume is the one you are on). There is one teen on my books who is on 72mg (1x54mg 1x18mg). My son has the 54mg in the morning then 10mg of Equasym (generic Ritalin) as a mid afternoon booster.

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This may be a stupid question but can ADD be genetically linked? My father was actually tested as an adult and found out he had it.

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This may be a stupid question but can ADD be genetically linked? My father was actually tested as an adult and found out he had it.

Oh yes.

 

There are several candidate genes, although there is no conclusive evidence as yet. But nonetheless there is a familial aspect to it. The heritability factor is about 25% officially. Personally I would say it is much, much higher than that.

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i have ADHD so not only can i not focus but i cannot sit still

i was undiagnosed for a very long time because my mother had issues with being in denial and i hate to say but i definitely suffered for that since i was being blamed and held responsible for something i was unable to completely control on my own without medication

i still have it as an adult i did not 'out grow' it

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Is it something one generally does outgrow?

 

My son was tested for it as a child but they said his was not severe enough to be considered a medical condition and require meds or therapy. His son was tested as a kindergardener and found to have it. Mom bi-polar and dad has focusing issues.

 

How many imaginative people don't have focusing issues though?

 

I doodled throughout school while in class. Sometimes I concentrated on the drawing but usually I just let my pencil roam the margins while I tried to listen to the teacher and decide what the nut shell version of what he/she had just said was. Most of my class seemed to do the same as almost everyone's notes had doodles all over them. It is kind of embarassing and interesting to find notebooks from decades ago with my art covered notes. I did discover that if my doodles dealt with the subject The grade in class tended to be higher.

 

ADHD kids who take meds and hate it and the way it makes them feel are hard to deal with. My grandson is very low weight. We changed this year to skipping the late afternoon at home dose of ritalin to back up the morning dose of 50mg vyvanse. He is finally eating better and getting hungry. However, I have to remind him frequently that skipping his late afternoon meds does not give him a free pass for being rude and not doing the things he needs to do.

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god my adhd sometimes just spikes and i feel like a puppy chasing a squirrel

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