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Autism/Aspergers

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Your Aspie score: 130 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 62 of 200

You are very likely an Aspie

 

Okay wow. Some of those questions really described me and my life so perfectly o_o

 

I've been suspecting something like this for awhile now, ever since my mom jokingly said to me "Do you have Aspburger's or something??" because I prefer to stay in my room alone, and don't like being in social situations. It made me start thinking about how I might actually have Aspburger's or something similar. I don't know how to bring it up to my parents that I suspect that I could have it...

 

Edit: I've heard that a lot of people who are diagnosed with Aspburger's don't really have it. Is this true, or just a rumour?

Haha yea there are a lot of things in the questions I could relate to and didn't even realize it. Like the standing/walking on your toes thing. I don't actually walk on my toes but when I'm sitting my feet always go up so only my toes and the balls of my feet are on the floor.

 

I knew I had Asperger's After reading about it for the first time. It just described me so well and I had always had problems with diagnosis because I had symptoms of other things but not enough to be officially diagnosed. I took an online test and because of the high score I got I prompted my mom and old psychiatrist that I thought I had it and needed confirmation. My old psychiatrist just kept saying that I would need to take all these tests and stuff, but then went on to say the medicine I was already on could handle Asperger's too. I'm on anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medicine, how would those help with a form of autism? She wasn't that good, we would just talk for 5 minutes or so (saw her once a month and nothing really happens) and then she would refill my medicine.

 

Big difference between her and my new psychiatrist that could tell I was an Aspie right away without a test.

 

 

And as for the false Asperger's diagnosis I honestly don't know if that's true. It's still new so of course there is going to be a whole bunch of people getting a diagnosis. There are probably also those people that think they have it, but usually the tests will tell them whether or not they actually have it. I just think people assume there are a bunch of false ones because of the large influx of people being diagnosed. Remember this syndrome didn't even become official until 1994

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I don't think there's anything wrong with the test prodding somebody to seek professional opinions--it can be a good thing!

 

And, it can also give you a little insight into how your brain works, even if you're not actually an aspie.

 

The problem, though, comes with people who just self-diagnose and just decide that that makes them a special snowflake or who just want a self-diagnosed label and don't actually want to seek out any information on their supposed "condition" (for lack of a better word).

Yep, for me it was something of a confirmation. I scored in the mid-range, and when I examined the results, what got me there was stuff associated with ADD and OCD. The former I have had an official diagnosis, the latter my psychiatrist suspects I have, but I haven't been officially tested.

Edited by Nectaris

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I'm on anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medicine, how would those help with a form of autism?

Incidently those actually *can* help with autism. A load of aspie issues can stem from anxiety - it's a large componant of meltdowns. So if you can handle the anxiety, then the major problems associated with it are less likely to happen.

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Incidently those actually *can* help with autism. A load of aspie issues can stem from anxiety - it's a large componant of meltdowns. So if you can handle the anxiety, then the major problems associated with it are less likely to happen.

Huh, didn't think about it like that. Too bad my medicine only helps to keep me normal. I still experience anxiety and panic attacks if something triggers it.

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Incidently those actually *can* help with autism. A load of aspie issues can stem from anxiety - it's a large componant of meltdowns. So if you can handle the anxiety, then the major problems associated with it are less likely to happen.

Seems so. This year, I took two courses of a locally produced anxiolytic drug. You know, it was one of the best decisions of my life. I was me - without the stress, and no drowziness - and suddenly everything seemed to work very smoothly, socializing, concentrating on things, etc. O__o

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I take 5-HTP for much the same reasons (that one was actually recommended to me in an aspie-only online forum). I'm just.... me. Unless I stop taking it, in which case I'm a nasty ball of stress.

 

That hasn't stopped to odd panic attack or meltdown, you understand. If the situation is bad enough those will happen anyway. It's just significantly reduced them. Funnily it's also reduce the amount of times I lock into extremely literal thinking, which also seems to be a by-product of my being massively stressed.

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those sound expensive... I don't know if my insurance would cover something that isn't a commonly used pill. I take the paxil genaric, the welbutron generic, and trazodon to help me sleep. And for emergencies I have lorazepam, but I hate taking that stuff because it doesn't actually calm me down, it puts me to sleep. My mom is like "So why does it matter? At least you aren't panicking". It matters because you don't fix anxiety by sleeping! I don't want to waste the day sleeping because I had a panic attack after my mom didn't pick up her phone. And I hate it so much when she tells me "Just take an ativan" when I get a hold of her and I'm in the midst of a panic attack.

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As it happens your insurance wouldn't cover it, because it's sold as a dietry supplement both in the US and where I am in the UK, but it's also not all that expensive. I just checked Amazon, and a 60 tablet bottle at 50mg (the doseage I take - you can get much stronger) can be bought for around $10. And I take 1 a day with dinner (2 if life is likely to be very stressful, 1 with breakfast and the 2nd as normal).

 

So, yeah, $10 for 3 months near enough. Not precisely cheap, but not bank-breaking either.

 

And, yeah, I feel you on the lorazepam. I've got Diazepam for emergencies, and it has much the same effect on me. Plus I can't drive once I've taken it - so totally useless if I'm out working.

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Oh wow that's not anywhere near what I thought it would be. I'll definitely have to look into it. Anything that can take me off harmful medicine is welcomed lol.

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Oh wow that's not anywhere near what I thought it would be. I'll definitely have to look into it. Anything that can take me off harmful medicine is welcomed lol.

It's certainly worth a try, I know it's made a big difference both to me and the other aspies I know that take it.

 

That said do talk it through with your Doc first. Largely because of Seratonin issues and how it may interact with anything else you may be on (saying that I took it at the same time as taking Citalopram with no issues). Better safe than sorry.

 

I know it's also used by people as a sleep aid, but I can't say that's something I've really noticed. I tend to take herbal Nytol, and I've got some sleeping tabs (can't surrently remember what they're called) for when things are getting desperate. I've also found I sleep better in a totally dark room - blackout curtains are one of the best investments we've ever made.

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Next time I go see my psychiatrist I'll have to mention it and see what she says about it. I know I've taken serotonin in the past and I think that one or two of my medicines effect my serotonin levels so definitely not going to just buy it and start taking it.

 

I honestly cannot sleep without aid, I'll be able to close my eyes for maybe 15 minutes at a time but it's just so hard to get comfortable no matter where I am. I also have blackout curtains, though they aren't the best and still let light through. Last week I ran out of my medicine and we didn't have enough money to buy them until my mom's next paycheck so I had to go 5 days without my medicine and by the time I finally got it I was so messed up from lack of sleep. And my mood had been slightly effected as well but I think that has to do with the sleep thing.

 

It was like, I would get comfortable enough to close my eyes but then suddenly my body would be like "NO SLEEP FOR YOU" and I just get to where I NEED to move my limbs or something because it hurt to keep them still. It's horrible.

 

I actually cannot stand being in the dark- I have nyctophobia. So I always need to have a little light whether it's from my tv or the lovely cat light made from stained glass pieces my sister got me.

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Because I have chronic allergies and atopic dermatitis, and take allergy pills on-and-off, if I feel too nervous or anything to sleep, I also keep at home pill varieties that cross the blood-brain barrier and cause drowsiness as a side-effect. Not suited for daytime use, but at night there's no harm if I take a little anti-histaminic that, oh by the way, knocks me out as well. |D

 

Actually, I know that a friend of mine, who's not an aspie, but is clinically depressed, was also advised to take blood-brain barrier crossing anti-histaminics for his sleep disturbances, mainly because they don't need a prescription and aren't particularly harmful if you don't have allergies to treat.

Edited by lightbird

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Hmmm, yes. Saying that, lightbird, I know my family have tended to use a type of travel sickness tablet (damned if I can remember the name off the top of my head) that has a similar effect of putting you to sleep. I seem to recall my Mum saying that my Grandfather (who was a chemist) had recommended it.

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We have a bottle of melatonin somewhere, dunno if it's still good or not though. I know that melatonin is used to like, help you get to sleep if you are already relaxing and ready for bed. But it didn't work for me if I was up and about after taking it.

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Huh. I brought it up to my mom about how I might be an Aspie, since I fit a ton of the characteristics, and she said that 3 years ago, when my parents tried to force me to go to a psychologist (long story), she told them that she thinks I have Asperger's. I wonder why parents didn't tell me, though blink.gif

 

Honestly, it makes a lot of sense now that I think about it..

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Huh. I brought it up to my mom about how I might be an Aspie, since I fit a ton of the characteristics, and she said that 3 years ago, when my parents tried to force me to go to a psychologist (long story), she told them that she thinks I have Asperger's. I wonder why parents didn't tell me, though blink.gif

 

Honestly, it makes a lot of sense now that I think about it..

Yea, it's a great feeling when things finally make sense and you know what it is you have. Maybe it has to do with younger children, but I didn't know what kind of anxiety I had for several years. I assumed separation anxiety since the majority of it happened when I couldn't get a hold of my parents. But it wasn't until my teens I was corrected by my parents telling me it's actually generalized anxiety and not separation anxiety.

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Hmmm, yes. Saying that, lightbird, I know my family have tended to use a type of travel sickness tablet (damned if I can remember the name off the top of my head) that has a similar effect of putting you to sleep. I seem to recall my Mum saying that my Grandfather (who was a chemist) had recommended it.

Interesting, didn't know that.

A no-go for me, though, because, iirc, from some antiemetics that my mother tried to fling at me before one of my plane rides, I saw that having a history of seizures is a contraindiction, so, with my clinical history of having a single epileptic seizure in my childhood, I didn't risk taking any...

 

Speaking of which, I remember that after that seizure (which I had when I was... 6?) I had to do a lot of doctor visits, EEGs, take sleeping pills, and that in some interview about my cognitive functions she commented that I was an anxious, easily excitable kid with fleeting attention, that I started speaking relatively late (later than my brother), and that I started walking unusually late (at 2,5 years, delayed motor skills) and that I didn't properly crawl either; I know parents were really concerned about me possibly never walking, but I think they attributed that idea more to the fact that during my birth the midwife yanked my hip joint, not mental development peculiarities.

 

Basically, I pieced together the notion that I might be an Aspie based on the above information, knowing that I tend to obsess over things, have difficulties concentrating on something that doesn't interest me, even if it needs to be done, am often considered inconsiderate in my actions and speech with others (like, not antisocially so, but not grasping the fine tunes of social behaviour) and have certain compulsive motor "ticks".

Edited by lightbird

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My psychiatrist said that delays in normal development like talking and walking and holding a pencil shouldn't be effected by Asperger's. I also actually ended up talking late, but that was mostly because my older sister could understand me and would translate for my parents. My psychiatrist actually said that might have been an early sign of my anxiety.

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I think originaly the language delay was considered to be the defining difference between HFA and Aspergers - one had it, the other didn't. With Aspergers being folded into the wider Autism Spectrum Condition diagnosis in the DSM-V.

 

*Shrugs* Not that it matters much, by the time you reach adult the difference between HFA and AS is all semantics anyway.

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Asperger's is a form of HFA itself.

It used to be a seperate and distinct diagnosis. At least it was when they diagnosed me. I think, as the two are pretty much identical anyway, the term is slowly being dropped.

 

But, yeah, I'd always just explain 'High Functioning Autism' to people, as most of them haven't heard of Aspergers.

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It used to be a seperate and distinct diagnosis. At least it was when they diagnosed me. I think, as the two are pretty much identical anyway, the term is slowly being dropped.

 

But, yeah, I'd always just explain 'High Functioning Autism' to people, as most of them haven't heard of Aspergers.

I do the same, it's a lot easier to say you are a high functioning autistic than to say you have Asperger's and then going on to try and explain what that is. I have a really hard time being able to describe certain things about myself, like how I'm feeling or what I'm thinking, or what it means to have Asperger's. You say HFA though, most people can understand. You have autism, but you are able function more normally than those that have the typical kind of autism.

Edited by Cecona

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My mom and I had a heart-to-heart tonight about self-discovery and Asperger's came up when I mentioned that ISTP (my Myers-Briggs personality type) is the most common personality type for people with Asperger's. I went over the Aspie Quiz with her (well, most of it) and we talked about my past and things I used to do, and we eventually came to a conclusion that, as an elementary schooler, I probably would have been diagnosed as Asperger's had my parents thought to get me tested.

 

Like, when I was younger, I didn't respond the same to different things as other kids. I was really passive. For example in preschool, my mom was at school with me on Valentine's Day, and I was sitting at a table doing a puzzle or something, and this kid pushes me out of the chair and says, "That's my chair." My mom was ready to hang the kid, and she thought I'd get up and defend myself and start a fight or tell the teacher or something, but instead I just went and got another chair. And that habit kind of continued on through elementary school until I went into depression my fourth grade year. I went to see a family psychologist and she told my parents that my social awkwardness was because of my giftedness: the more "gifted" a person, the more difficulty they have learning social skills. Heck, my IQ tested 142 in second grade, so it was definitely possible. And she suggested that they put me in a program for gifted students where they not only work the intellectual aspect, but also the social. Had she mentioned Asperger's or autism at the time, I think my parents would've had me tested, and I probably would've come out positive.

 

I've never been good at social courtesies. Just not my thing. Totally. Could never be a teacher or a businessperson or spokesperson or lawyer or whatever. Probably couldn't be a doctor either because then I have to, like, talk to my patients (though if I were a dietician, then I could get paid to talk my patients half to death about "food is medicine" and things like that biggrin.gif).

 

Speaking of food, I ate an almost all white diet when I was little due to texture and color aversions. It's gotten better, especially since I've discovered fish, but I do still occasionally have issues with food texture, and I still have a tendency to judge by color. They should make that a question on the quiz because it is relavant to Asperger's (or so I read).

 

I also have some idiosyncrasies about holding myself. Like, I never know what to do with my arms, and I fiddle with my hands, and apparently when I was younger and up until middle or high school I used to flap my hands whenever I was talking, and I lean forward a bit when I walk, which I always attributed to balance and I never thought anything of it other than when I got annoyed when my mom would grab my shoulders and straighten them up in public and it was totally uncomfortable for me; I assumed she'd stopped doing that because I was finally "getting it right" but I guess not.

 

At the same time, there are quite a few traits of Aspies that just don't apply to me. I know how to be emotional (sometimes lol) and I don't ever recall having language development problems. No perception problems other than I'm nearly blind (figuratively speaking). I read that a lot of people with perfect pitch are Aspies or that a lot of Aspies have perfect pitch, one or the other. Anyway that's not relevant to this paragraph.

 

Even if I haven't really changed what I do with my body, I guess I've learned a lot of coping strategies. Enough that if I were to go get an official diagnosis now they probably wouldn't give it to me, or they might tell me I was an extreme borderline case if anything.

 

Following all of that and knowing now what I know, I retook the test and came up with the following scores:

 

Your Aspie score: 105 of 200

Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 92 of 200

You seem to have both Aspie and neurotypical traits

 

It's the first time I've tested and gotten results like this specifically, where my Aspie score was higher than my NT score.

 

Breakdown:

Aspie talent: 7.8 of 10 (above average) (high is related to giftedness)

Neurotypical talent: 4.3 of 10 (average) (low seems to be related to ADD/ADHD)

Aspie compulsion: 5.6 of 10 (average) (high is related to OCD)

Neurotypical compulsion: 2.4 of 10 (below average)

Aspie social: 4.8 of 10 (average) (high is related to ADD, ADHD, ODD, and bipolar)

Neurotypical social: 4.0 of 10 (average) (low is related to social phobia)

Aspie communication: 6.2 of 10 (average) (high is sometimes related to Tourette's)

Neurotypical communication: 4.6 of 10 (average) (low is related to autism spectrum conditions)

Aspie hunting: 5.5 of 10 (average)

Neurotypical hunting: 7.6 of 10 (above average) (low is related to dyslexia and dyscalculia)

Aspie perception: 3.9 of 10 (average)

Neurotypical perception: 7.6 of 10 (above average) (low is related to dyspraxia)

Environment: 4.0 of 10 (average) (high is usually required to get a diagnosis)

 

 

So yeah. That's my blurb for the next few months or so.

 

 

Edit: Here's something of a diagnostic tool. I had my mom answer it for my behaviors when I was younger and I scored 21 of 31, which is in the range of possible ASD (15+).

http://psychology-tools.com/cast/

Edited by Snickie

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