Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It's... possible for humans to be healthy without meats, but easier with moderate meats :3

 

I want some duck right now so much you don't even know guys. Ducks are so tasty I can't.

Ah, certainly it is.

My point is that it is not by design and thus, as you said, not easy. For some people it's a lot harder to keep up without some problems/intense weight loss or, at least, feeling like they somehow had more energy when they had meat in their diet.

 

Duck is so good, ff. You're making me hungry and it's almost midnight, lmao! If I eat anything it'll likely screw with the harmony of my metabolism and stomach. The torture. ;_;

Share this post


Link to post

Haha! Different time zones! Here in singapore, it's still lunchtime, and the nearest source of duck is only a few hundred metres away. I'm off to nom on duck flesh. Byeee!

Share this post


Link to post

I eat meat and I'll agree with all those that said it's something natural. But I have to add 3 reasons that we have to eat meat

1)Biological: I have low ferrum and I have to eat meat and take supplements too, in order not to faint.

2)Economical: All these vegeterian products are costing too much, especially at lent period and when you're at a university in other city you can't survive.

3)Moral: When you refuse to eat an animal you're doing that, because you don't want to remove a life or to make a life suffer, but plants are also living organisms and they have "thews" as animals have, so when you're cutting a lettuce leaf it feels it. Plants, also breathing and doing photosynthesis after you cut them, so they're more "alive" than animals. So when you think this way, you'll only have to it fruits eggs and milk products.

 

The only things I refuse to eat, not because of the taste, are crabs because they're boiled alive and callista-chione (gyalisteres we're calling them, they're shells) because you can't it them boiled, but you eat them alive and you have to throw lemon on them in order to see if they're alive.

Share this post


Link to post

Vegetarian and Vegan options are a privilege. Some people can't afford (Not just money, but also biologically) that privilege, or simply do not want it. And that's find. What you eat doesn't make you a bad person. Unless your eating other people in which case that's illegal in the US because it desecrates a corpse and you probably had to murder someone to eat them.

 

My own biological design makes it so I have to eat meat. I have an iron deficiency and when I don't eat red meat, I get anemic and pass out. I could take supplements but the ones I've tried react poorly with my stomach and I've always thrown up. Plus, meat is tasty. Cows are adorable but delicious too.

Share this post


Link to post
Unless your eating other people

That's just a perfect sentence.

 

 

I don't eat meat, and I never could. It seems disgusting to me... no offence if you eat it though. I also believe that we don't need meat to survive. I get a pretty good amount of protein. It's a bit more challenging since I don't eat gluten either, though, but I still get plenty. In fact, I often make a vegan gluten free pizza with tomato sauce and veggies and it tastes wonderful. Who needs cheese?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post

The human system is based around an omnivorous diet, so it could be argued that forgoing entirely either meat or veg is bad.

 

There's nothing wrong with killing something and eating it. Cows, simply put, are delicious. So are chickens and turkeys and most people tell me game meat tastes good too (I've never had game).

 

I will never understand how people see killing an animal for food as something wrong. We are built to derive some of our nutrition from meat. You can go without it, but you have to go to extra lengths then to find the nutrition you'd normally get from meat elsewhere.

 

I like meat and will never go vegetarian or vegan. For starters there's far too much I refuse to eat in the veg/fruit sections either due to taste or texture.

That said I can't eat a lot of red meat; I tend to get sick if I do, but I love the occasional hamburger or beef taco. I eat lighter, white meats like poultry. Fried chicken ftw v:

 

We don't /have/ to eat meat, though; we aren't obligate carnivores.

 

What you eat doesn't make you a bad person. Unless your eating other people in which case that's illegal in the US because it desecrates a corpse and you probably had to murder someone to eat them.

 

Cannibalism doesn't make you a bad person, either. It's taboo and illegal because of culture. In the end, we are all just pieces of meat when we die.

There's a tribe in the Amazon that eats (or used to) eat their deceased because they didn't want to bury them in the ground; it was a way for the deceased to continue on in some way I think - so culture is effectively the entire reason for cannibalism being viewed as good or bad.

Share this post


Link to post

Being vegetarian on a budget is possible, just challenging. Beans or peanut butter are good sources of non-animal based proteins that don't cost much. I'm a college student living on a very limited budget, but I try to avoid eating meat because I consider it immoral. I'm not as careful as I'd like - back to the budget issue, I can't afford humanely produced dairy or eggs all the time - but I have been mostly vegetarian for about a year now and am still in relatively good health.

Share this post


Link to post

I am not against eating meat in and of itself. Our ancestors ate meat for tens of thousands of years, and we've only lived a modern life for a short period of time. It's far too little time for our bodies to adjust. Now, that being said, the WAY we eat meat now is something I have an issue with. We eat meat that is filled with hormones and chemicals, processed in ways that are no good for anyone, and from animals who have lived lives no animals should have to live. We take only certain cuts from certain species, which means we are not getting the true nutrition that meat brought our ancestors. Most of us avoid the organ meats, don't eat the bone marrow, wouldn't touch an insect if our lives depended on it, etc. These are the parts with the most nutritive qualities, and they should be eaten along with the rest, and a wide variety of meats will give the best overall diet. We also eat far too much meat for most of our genetic backgrounds. If you are Inuit (or another from historically long culture with similar diets), I'll grant that your ancestors had much more time to evolve around eating almost exclusively meat (again, with eating all parts!), but most of us come from people who ate a good mix of meat and plants. Hunters AND gatherers.

 

So, given the way modern Western society eats meat, I choose to eat very little of it. I only eat seafood (in limited quantities) or meat that I know was raised properly or raise it myself (which pretty much means I have to know the person who raised it, because most of the 'cage free' marketing and such is hardly more than a marketing scam with very little real improvement to the way the animals are raised).

 

There are international students in my department who can attest for the fact that how Western culture raises animals (America and Canada, I'm looking at you especially) is not at all what they are used to. The meat does not even taste the same! Having grown up raising our own chickens and other meats, I actually find commercially raised meat to be pretty...weird tasting.

Edited by harlequinraven

Share this post


Link to post

I eat meat; always have, and I don't see myself becoming vegetarian/vegan anytime soon. I really don't see much wrong with it; yes, some animals are raised in cruel conditions but what am I supposed to do when organic-grass-fed-enviromentally-friendly-super-eco beef is super expensive? And harlequinraven makes a good point; you think our ancestors (think caveman) turned their noses up at meat when it was available? Nu-uh. Seafood is delicious so I eat that too; why not?

 

The saddest thing I see is vegetarians who think they're better than other people just because they don't eat meat....that attitude gets really old really fast. That's the real tragedy to me; drawing lines based on whether someone eats what you think is right or not. Vegetarian, omnivore, carnivore; I don't care. It's your choice not mine, do what you like.

Share this post


Link to post

Do I eat meat? Oh yes, definitely, I do.

 

My family aren't really vegetarians, it just isn't how we were raised. THOUGH at our house we typically eat more chicken than we do beef. ( Which is sort of a special treat). I am sort of an omnivore, if the truth were told. Put a steak or piece of chicken in front of me and I will eat it, but by the same token but a salad or a potato in front of me and I would just as easily eat that, too. I have studied a fair amount of Biology and figure the human body is suited to a diet of BOTH. Besides, strictly speaking, the main reason that some animals were bred at all was, quite truthfully, to be eaten. If it weren't for the fact that people eat steak, there would be a lot fewer cows in the world because there would be no reason for farmers to raise them.

 

That said, I have no ISSUES, as such, with vegetarians, I just couldn't be one myself.

Edited by Silverswift

Share this post


Link to post
Do I eat meat? Oh yes, definitely, I do.

 

My family aren't really vegetarians, it just isn't how we were raised. THOUGH at our house we typically eat more chicken than we do beef. ( Which is sort of a special treat). I am sort of an omnivore, if the truth were told. Put a steak or piece of chicken in front of me and I will eat it, but by the same token but a salad or a potato in front of me and I would just as easily eat that, too. I have studied a fair amount of Biology and figure the human body is suited to a diet of BOTH. Besides, strictly speaking, the main reason that some animals were bred at all was, quite truthfully, to be eaten. If it weren't for the fact that people eat steak, there would be a lot fewer cows in the world because there would be no reason for farmers to raise them.

 

That said, I have no ISSUES, as such, with vegetarians, I just couldn't be one myself.

Well there's still milk as a reason to raise cattle. It's not like cows are only raised to be eaten.

Share this post


Link to post

I will grant you that that is true, Seven.

 

Perhaps I should have clarified my statement better. There certainly are other reasons to raise cattle, or chickens either, than for meat. Milk, which you point out as an example, is a big one in my area of the world. What I meant is that for those animals that are used for meat that was often the only reason they were raised. The cattle raised for milking are typically different breeds than the ones raised for meat. At least, that is the case in my country. I understand it may not be that way everywhere. The same goes for chickens, I think... the ones raised for egg production are a different breed than the ones raised for meat. So yes, what you say is correct, but for those cattle that are raised for meat, or chickens either, that is the main reason they were bred.

 

So... technically we both have valid points.

Edited by Silverswift

Share this post


Link to post

I would like to add to silverswift a lot of chicken breeds are used for both meat and eggs, just certain breeds are preferred for the more specific meat or eggs due to taste and egg size/production.

 

I am a omnivore myself, trying to put more vegetables in my diet since that never hurt a soul! But I do love meat. Unfortunately, being at college and on such a tight budget means I can go and get the meat the quality I prefer. I am lucky there is a place not far that sells bison so when I do have the money I go there. Its the farm's restaurant so you basically are seeing what you are going to eat. I am hard pressed to say I've had a better piece of meat.

Share this post


Link to post

I would like to add to silverswift a lot of chicken breeds are used for both meat and eggs, just certain breeds are preferred for the more specific meat or eggs due to taste and egg size/production.

Well said.

Edited by Silverswift

Share this post


Link to post

I enjoy meat and vegetables. But I have rules governing my meat.

 

I respect the animal who gave its life so I may eat. Therefore, I do my best to eat what I have been given with as little waste as possible. I feel that waste of the meat is a greater sin than eating it. Eating it the animal becomes part of me.

 

I am not going to hunt unless I have to. And then if I hunt, I hunt with respect and not for fun. Killing is never fun. It is very sad.

 

When I have killed something for food, I have appologised to the animal and thanked it for its sacrifice and then I eat it. "If I kill it I eat it" so as an aspect of my rule, I am not about to kill things I am not going to eat - such as spiders.

 

As a chef, I do not condone practices such as force feeding geese/ducks (foie gras) or Kobe Beef. I have eaten these products because it was part of my course, and taken left overs of these products home to finish off. However my reasoning falls back to "waste is a greater sin than eating it" The animal already gave its life for the product so the most honour and respect I could do is eat it. Otherwise, I would not go out and purchase these products because of how the animal was raised.

 

Many places do attempt to slaughter the animals as humanely as possible but unfortunately you cannot make killing something nice or pleasant. Simply respect.

 

My college has definitely attempted to get us to consider where our food comes from so we may better understand and respect it.

 

And I will say this in closing - there is a better method to killing lobsters than dropping it in a pot of boiling water. It's sticking it in the head with the knife. If anyone says "the lobster dies instantly when put in boiling water" it's a lie. They do not and I was terribly upset by the experience.

 

Respect and be considerate of the animals and even plants you eat.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Do you have any reliable sources on Kobe beef cattle being force fed, because I'm having trouble finding good ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Do I eat meat? Oh yes, definitely, I do.

 

My family aren't really vegetarians, it just isn't how we were raised. THOUGH at our house we typically eat more chicken than we do beef. ( Which is sort of a special treat). I am sort of an omnivore, if the truth were told. Put a steak or piece of chicken in front of me and I will eat it, but by the same token but a salad or a potato in front of me and I would just as easily eat that, too. I have studied a fair amount of Biology and figure the human body is suited to a diet of BOTH. Besides, strictly speaking, the main reason that some animals were bred at all was, quite truthfully, to be eaten. If it weren't for the fact that people eat steak, there would be a lot fewer cows in the world because there would be no reason for farmers to raise them.

 

That said, I have no ISSUES, as such, with vegetarians, I just couldn't be one myself.

Which is probably a good thing considering cow farts contribute hugely to the methane being released into the atmosphere- and that's a bad thing.

Share this post


Link to post

Do you have any reliable sources on Kobe beef cattle being force fed, because I'm having trouble finding good ones.

no they are not force fed, but their lives are not exactly what I would consider nice. Only the fois gras geese/ducks are force fed.

Edited by Starscream

Share this post


Link to post

I enjoy meat and vegetables. But I have rules governing my meat.

 

I respect the animal who gave its life so I may eat. Therefore, I do my best to eat what I have been given with as little waste as possible. I feel that waste of the meat is a greater sin than eating it. Eating it the animal becomes part of me.

 

I am not going to hunt unless I have to. And then if I hunt, I hunt with respect and not for fun. Killing is never fun. It is very sad.

 

When I have killed something for food, I have appologised to the animal and thanked it for its sacrifice and then I eat it. "If I kill it I eat it" so as an aspect of my rule, I am not about to kill things I am not going to eat -  such as spiders.

 

As a chef, I do not condone practices such as force feeding geese/ducks (foie gras) or Kobe Beef. I have eaten these products because it was part of my course, and taken left overs of these products home to finish off. However my reasoning falls back to "waste is a greater sin than eating it" The animal already gave its life for the product so the most honour and respect I could do is eat it. Otherwise, I would not go out and purchase these products because of how the animal was raised.

 

Many places do attempt to slaughter the animals as humanely as possible but unfortunately you cannot make killing something nice or pleasant. Simply respect.

 

My college has definitely attempted to get us to consider where our food comes from so we may better understand and respect it.

 

And I will say this in closing -  there is a better method to killing lobsters than dropping it in a pot of boiling water. It's sticking it in the head with the knife. If anyone says "the lobster dies instantly when put in boiling water" it's a lie. They do not and I was terribly upset by the experience.

 

Respect and be considerate of the animals and even plants you eat.

Yes, being aware of where your food comes from is a healthy thing; something that I feel may be more rare than it used to be. Seems like there is more ignorance about exactly that sort of thing with fewer people being directly involved in raising the plants and animals intended for food. My mom grew up on a farm and her family were by no means rich so... we tended to waste very little food, and even now I try to avoid wasting it whenever possible. In that respect I understand what you are saying.

Edited by Silverswift

Share this post


Link to post

Well, I've been watching a few videos concerning eating meat. People believe they shouldn't eat meat because you're eating something that used to have life. They think it's wrong to eat something that used to be able to move and think on its own will.

 

I think it is a bit funny. Someone do not eat meat because that WERE LIVED?! But they eat plants at the same time? Are not plants also living things? And mushrooms to?

If someone say she or he do not eat things what once lived then she or he could eat metal, rocks, water or pure energy, all of them obviously foolish...

 

Or they may eat artificial meat. There is such thing but I think it still experimental and tastes terrible...

Or eat nothing and just sit and await until they starving to death. Good option? Not so sure...

 

And arguing the sentence: "used to be able to move and think on its own will"...

Where could we know for absolutely sure that plants are not intelligent on some degree? Afterall they learn to react the effects of nature and even learn to evolve such ways to ensure their survival against pest insects or bacterial, viral threats. Just because something do not move and can not be tamed to sit and waggle it's tail we have no right to declare it has no will, no intelligence on his own.

 

And Humans are mostly carnivores, although evolved from mostly herbivore precursors. More accurately mixed-diet precursors what eat more plants than meat, still eat meat. It is an evolutionary fact what hard to deny or neglect.

And another fact: We can not diggest plants but we can do diggest meat. The organ what responsible to diggest plants, cellulose and other things is the appendix vermiformis, an organ what is little or not functioning in Homo sapiens' case. What kind of herbivore may should we be if we can not diggest what we just eat? Bad, surely...

 

Still, we are clearly not carnivores. We just do not have the prerequisites and also have a far to long digesting time to be effective meat-feasters. We are on a mixed-diet and this is good. Why are we need to decide if we are herbi- or carnivores? Is this matters so much for us? If yes, it induces some psichological things, I mean those who really want to force such decisions and force their digestive-systems to adapt such a decision, is a medical case. It IS NOT HEALTHY! On the other hand, everyone must die somehow, so it is a decision of the path what lead to our chosen death, mayhaps...

 

The truth is this: Meat is good with vegetables! Delicious. Something what is best together! Believe me wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
no they are not force fed, but their lives are not exactly what I would consider nice. Only the fois gras geese/ducks are force fed.

How does it differ from, say, the state of cattle farming in America?

Share this post


Link to post

How does it differ from, say, the state of cattle farming in America?

This... is actually a good question. I have HEARD of Kobe beef, but I am honestly not sure what is true and what is rumor.

Edited by Silverswift

Share this post


Link to post

Kobe beef are kept in pens and prevented from moving as much as possible. Movement would toughen muscle fibres. As a result the animals cannot walk far when they do because of lactic acid build up in the muscles (ever ride or run and your legs start to burn? that's lactic acid).

 

My chef does say they get massages and live a royal life. If that means standing in one place until day zero... I am not sure I agree.

 

Animals in feed lots generally do get to move about, albeit they are often crazy levels of crowded. But they are still free to move.

 

Kobe beef outside of Kobe Japan is called Wagyu as Kobe is a protected designation. Although these animals typically have high percentage of intramuscular fat. This is what makes them very tender.

 

Kobe is also crazy levels of expensive. It's not bad tasting, but rather gross to look at for all the fat involved. We had a class a month or so back where we tried, various beef against each other, kobe, corn fed, grass fed, wet aged and dry aged meats so we could understand some of the subtle differences.

 

I can't say I like how cattle are farmed in factory farms - these farms increase the risk for horrible things like e-coli (typically found in grain fed cattle as opposed to grass fed cattle). I tend to prefer to purchase meats from smaller farms, and local butchers where I can ask where or what the meat comes from. There is a lovely cheese maker about 60km away from me that produces cheese from cattle on a farm down the road from them.

 

We had a gentleman from Rowe farms give a talk a while back and he purposefully moves the feed area around the farm so the Cattle get a chance to walk to and from the barn. he said that he does not typically get the prime grades on his meat because the beasties tend to burn off the fat, but they are typically healthier and more resilient against diseases.

 

the argument of people not wanting to eat meats due to Antibiotics and growth hormones if very valid. Meats from places like Rowe Farms is generally expensive and tends to be out of the reach of lower income people (such as myself). I tend to purchase the meat from this place when it's on last day of sale, freeze it for later. The chickens are by far the meatiest birds I have ever had the chance to sink my teeth into.

 

The prime gradings - at least in Canada(low end of the best) A AA AAA and Prime (best of the best) are based on the marbling of the meat, and typically the beasts are fed corn just before slaughter because this gives them that fattiness. The better the grade the more intramuscular fat. As I said before this makes the meat tender and adds flavour. In Canada this sort of grading is voluntary.

 

Interesting things to look out for. Meat from young animals will be white or ivory in colour, if it starts to look noticeably yellow, this is meat from older animals. It's worse if it's being sold as a young animal.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Kobe beef are kept in pens and prevented from moving as much as possible. Movement would toughen muscle fibres. As a result the animals cannot walk far when they do because of lactic acid build up in the muscles (ever ride or run and your legs start to burn? that's lactic acid).

 

My chef does say they get massages and live a royal life. If that means standing in one place until day zero... I am not sure I agree.

 

Animals in feed lots generally do get to move about, albeit they are often crazy levels of crowded. But they are still free to move.

 

Kobe beef outside of Kobe Japan is called Wagyu as Kobe is a protected designation. Although these animals typically have high percentage of intramuscular fat. This is what makes them very tender.

 

Kobe is also crazy levels of expensive. It's not bad tasting, but rather gross to look at for all the fat involved. We had a class a month or so back where we tried, various beef against each other, kobe, corn fed, grass fed, wet aged and dry aged meats so we could understand some of the subtle differences.

 

I can't say I like how cattle are farmed in factory farms - these farms increase the risk for horrible things like e-coli (typically found in grain fed cattle as opposed to grass fed cattle). I tend to prefer to purchase meats from smaller farms, and local butchers where I can ask where or what the meat comes from. There is a lovely cheese maker about 60km away from me that produces cheese from cattle on a farm down the road from them.

 

We had a gentleman from Rowe farms give a talk a while back and he purposefully moves the feed area around the farm so the Cattle get a chance to walk to and from the barn. he said that he does not typically get the prime grades on his meat because the beasties tend to burn off the fat, but they are typically healthier and more resilient against diseases.

 

the argument of people not wanting to eat meats due to Antibiotics and growth hormones if very valid. Meats from places like Rowe Farms is generally expensive and tends to be out of the reach of lower income people (such as myself). I tend to purchase the meat from this place when it's on last day of sale, freeze it for later. The chickens are by far the meatiest birds I have ever had the chance to sink my teeth into.

 

The prime gradings - at least in Canada(low end of the best) A AA AAA and Prime (best of the best) are based on the marbling of the meat, and typically the beasts are fed corn just before slaughter because this gives them that fattiness. The better the grade the more intramuscular fat. As I said before this makes the meat tender and adds flavour. In Canada this sort of grading is voluntary.

 

Interesting things to look out for. Meat from young animals will be white or ivory in colour, if it starts to look noticeably yellow, this is meat from older animals. It's worse if it's being sold as a young animal.

I have also heard that the Kobe cattle are given alcohol as well. Is that true?

Share this post


Link to post

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.